Law Schools

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IU Maurer's Austen Parrish builds relationships beyond the law school

July 16, 2014
Austen Parrish was happy at Southwestern Law School where he taught and served as an administrator for 11 years. He liked the school and his work so much that he was never tempted to apply for the dean vacancies that open every year – until he learned Indiana University Maurer School of Law was looking.More.

IU Maurer to begin offering scholarships to Wabash College grads

July 2, 2014
Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Wabash College have entered into an agreement establishing a scholarship and mentorship program for Wabash students interested in going to law school.More.

Indianapolis law grads reflect on Maennerchor years

July 2, 2014
Not quite 50 years have passed since Indiana University’s law school in Indianapolis moved from the Maennerchor Building. The old place is long gone, but some of its last graduates gathered recently to share memories of a time that holds special meaning.More.

Mastering the law without a J.D.

July 2, 2014
The move by two Indiana law schools to follow a national trend and offer master’s degrees to non-lawyers has many practicing lawyers asking where the graduates of these programs will fit into the legal profession.More.

Valparaiso law school welcomes new dean

July 1, 2014
Andrea Lyon, the first woman to lead the Valparaiso University Law School, began her tenure July 1 as the dean.More.
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  1. From the perspective of a practicing attorney, it sounds like this masters degree in law for non-attorneys will be useless to anyone who gets it. "However, Ted Waggoner, chair of the ISBA’s Legal Education Conclave, sees the potential for the degree program to actually help attorneys do their jobs better. He pointed to his practice at Peterson Waggoner & Perkins LLP in Rochester and how some clients ask their attorneys to do work, such as filling out insurance forms, that they could do themselves. Waggoner believes the individuals with the legal master’s degrees could do the routine, mundane business thus freeing the lawyers to do the substantive legal work." That is simply insulting to suggest that someone with a masters degree would work in a role that is subpar to even an administrative assistant. Even someone with just a certificate or associate's degree in paralegal studies would be overqualified to sit around helping clients fill out forms. Anyone who has a business background that they think would be enhanced by having a legal background will just go to law school, or get an MBA (which typically includes a business law class that gives a generic, broad overview of legal concepts). No business-savvy person would ever seriously consider this ridiculous master of law for non-lawyers degree. It reeks of desperation. The only people I see getting it are the ones who did not get into law school, who see the degree as something to add to their transcript in hopes of getting into a JD program down the road.

  2. Lyle Hardman said it well. There is no point to these degrees, and universities should have the dignity not to act like product-peddlers offering useless certificates.

  3. Yo soy un hombre sincero De donde crece la palma, Y antes de morirme quiero Echar mis versos del alma.

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