ILNews

423 law students pass July 2012 Indiana bar exam

IL Staff
November 7, 2012
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Indiana Lawyer Focus

The Indiana Lawyer congratulates the individuals listed below on passing the July 2012 bar exam. Many of these young and aspiring lawyers particpated in the Indiana Supreme Court Admission Ceremony held Oct. 15, 2012, in Indianapolis.

Mark Lewis Adam

Michelle Renee Adams

Nicholas Robert Adams

Carter Lange Alleman

Larry Dean Allen

Annemarie Christine Alonso

Michelle Anne Alyea

Brenda Lynn Ambrosius

Emily LaGene Angel

Jarryd Franklin Anglin

Joshua Paul Astin

Ivo Andrew Austin

Gulomjon Azimov

Tyler Guy Banks

Thomas Bradley Barbour

Bertina Candace Barnes

Lisa Ashley Baron

Matthew Thomas Barr

Andrew James Brian Bartelt

Theodore Ralph Batson Jr.

Angela Katherine Battaglino

John Peter Bayard

Kathleen Elys Beatty

Kory Todd Bell

Brian Michael Bennett

Laura Lee Bird

Michael James Bolde

Denise Michelle Bonk

Pamela Sarah Boshears

Hiroshi Clifford Bowman

Thomas Scott Bowman

Kerry Shea Boyne

Scott Edwin Brady

Katelyn M. Brant

Tyler Earl Brant

Isabella Helene Bravo

Andrew William Breck

Kevin Patrick Brett

Michael Steven Brewer

Ashley Lauren Brian

Stephanie Hope Bridgewater

Molly Elizabeth Briles

Whitney Marie Brockus

Joseph Striker Brown

Sean Allan Brown

Mallory Kristin Bryan

John Michael Bundy

Aimee Nicole Burkert

Kelly Ann Burns

Joshua Thomas Busch

Amanda Elizabeth Bushemi

Jenna Breanne Butler

Cristal Lisa Cabrera

Benjamin William Campbell

Courtney Elizabeth Campbell

Michael Andrew Campbell

Jason James Cerman

Ellen Josephine Drummond Chambers

Mark Andrew San Nicolas Chargualaf

Steven Timothy Charles

Aleksander Martin Cirulis

Megan Leigh Clearwaters

Christopher Lynn Clerc

Thomas Elisha Clowers

Chantel Maria Colavecchia

Jeffrey Christopher Conner

Nathaniel Scott Connor

Aaron Gabriel Corn

Adam Douglas Cotter

Bobby Aaron Courtney

Gregory Alan Cranston

Jamey Ann Critchlow

Gunnar Mark Crowell

Blake Nathaniel Dahl

Amanda Katherine Dalton

Nicholas Carl Dau-Schmidt

Sarah Kathryn DeHart

Brienne Marie Delaney

Saulo Israel Delgado

Julie Marie DeMuth

Kathryn Elizabeth DeWeese

Janelle VanBakel Dewitt

Matthew Patrick Dinn

Daniel Adam Dixon

Safiya Latrice Dixon

Todd Anthony Dixon

Erica Jean Dobbs

Erica Kay Drew

Samuel Curtis Drummy

Rachel Lindsey Dubin

Nicholas Carper Dugan

Andrew Harold Duncan III

Julia Bernadette Dunisch

Nicholaus Dwight Eddy

Jarred Lee Eib

Julie Marie Elliott

James Robert Emerson

Charles Christopher Engel II

Christopher Robert Erikson

Matthew Jack Estell

Cherlyn Ann Evans

Amy Lynn Eversole

Kyle Kennedy Fairchild

Timothy John Fandrey

Ashley Anne Federer

Janeen Louise Feinberg

Darrell Edward Felling II

Keenan Charles Fennimore

Jon Adam Ferguson

Elizabeth Ferrufino

Lucas Myron Fields

Kevin Michael Fitzgerald

James Russell Flecker

Ian Michael Fleming

Andrew Michael Flittner

Katherine Elizabeth Flood

Kyle William Fogwell

Cynthia Lynne Forbes

Corbin Ross Fowler

Sarah Lynn Fowler

Amanda Michelle Frantz

Mark Andrew Frantz

Michael Charles Freddoso

Dustin Francis Fregiato

Joseph Willi Friedmann

Joshua David Froelich

Jessica Marie Butler Fry

Ryan James Funk

Nicholas Daniel Gaffney

Michael Scott Gallo

Geneva Glenn Garcia

Matthew Michael Gardlik

Richard William Gardner

Ryan Matthew Gardner

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

ADVERTISEMENT