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Lawyer enjoys representing the creator of the world's most famous cartoon cat

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In-House Counsel

It may be surprising to some that a global phenomenon – with a daily newspaper, TV, and overall cultural presence in 63 countries and translated into 23 languages – has only one in-house lawyer to represent his interests. That phenomenon is Garfield the cat, the larger-than-life orange tabby who hates Mondays, loves lasagna, and is created and recreated on a regular basis at the Paws Inc. studio in Albany, just outside of Muncie. According to the company, 96 percent of the world population knows and loves the finicky feline.

Attorney Bob Beasley has represented Garfield-creator and Hoosier Jim Davis since the early 1980s. Beasley worked in his father’s Muncie law firm at the time he began his representation, but he left the firm in 1991 for a job at a title company.

In 1993, Davis asked Beasley to come on board full time to represent his work; Beasley is and has been the only in-house attorney in the office most of the time since then.

Beasley Bob Beasley, above, does intellectual property and contract work, among other duties for Paws Inc. in Albany. He has represented the creator of Garfield since the early 1980s.. (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Most of Beasley’s work for the company relates to intellectual property matters: copyright issues, licensing agreements, contracts for TV shows – including one now airing on Cartoon Network – and movies, such as the two live-action films that starred Bill Murray as the voice of Garfield.

Another aspect of his work is seeking out counterfeit Garfield products, particularly in Asia and Latin America. He did more of this shortly after Davis was able to purchase the rights to his comic strip character from the newspaper syndicate in 1994. However, the company now has enough people in place around the world to help be on the look out.

When it comes to the licensing aspect of his job, which is a good portion of the work, he said Davis and his wife, Jill, first approve all requests before Beasley sees them.

However, among the more interesting requests he said are grave stones and toilet seats. He said the grave stones are sometimes specifically mentioned in a person’s funeral arrangements and he suspects that they are mainly for people who were affectionate or just big fans of Garfield.

For the toilet seat licensing request, however, Beasley was a little skeptical at first; he was surprised to learn later that they are a pretty big seller for Garfield-themed bathrooms, particularly for kids.

On a tour of all the licensed products at Paws Inc. – which are all designed in house – Beasley also pointed out a computer keyboard with a Garfield image over the keys, baby clothes, and back-to-school supplies such as backpacks, watches, and leather jackets.

Another aspect of his job is working with a non-profit organization, Professor Garfield, which is a partnership between Paws Inc. and Ball State University. Ball State provides the educational component of a website to promote literacy among children who are in kindergarten and first grade. Paws Inc. then provides the creative and Garfield stories to engage the students and teachers who use it. The website for the organization is www.professorgarfield.org

He is also an active member of the Indiana Bar Foundation, for which he is serving as president after spending about half a dozen years on the board of directors.

He said his father was a strong influence on him when it came to why pro bono work was important for lawyers, and the organization appreciates his work.

“Bob’s been a great leader in sharing our civics message with fellow attorneys in both one-on-one meetings and at larger events,” said Theresa Browning, IBF director of development and communications. “He spoke passionately recently to our fellows about how Indiana’s civic education programming is held in high regard by other states. … I’ve also heard him speak passionately about the impact of [Interest on Lawyer Trust Accounts] rates on pro bono assistance. He obviously cares deeply about providing access to justice for our citizens.”

He compared the company culture to some of the intellectual property firms with which he has worked, although the company focuses on the creativity of the employees and is more artist heavy. Other firms and companies he’s worked with while representing Paws have seemed to have more business people and fewer artists.

Because of this, Beasley said he was a little unsure how he’d fit in as the only lawyer when he first started. But he said he has felt nothing but welcome by Davis and the other staff since he started there.

Beasley recently opened a general practice in downtown Muncie with Davis’ permission. A happy accident in this case was Beasley’s son, Samuel, who learned he passed the bar in May and is a fourth generation lawyer, will work with him at the firm.

But opening a new firm doesn’t mean Beasley’s work at Paws has slowed down, it’s just that he wanted to take on some outside legal work so that when he’s ready to move on, it will be an easy transition to represent other clients and continue the practice of law.

“I love my work here, but at this stage in my career I wanted to get a foot back into private practice,” he said. “I missed the variety and the personal nature of private practice.”

Beasley said his father continued to practice into his 70s, something Beasley admired and hopes he will also be able to do. But realistically, he didn’t think he’d be in-house counsel for the company forever.

But while he remains at Paws, he is a respected member of the company.

“Currently, Bob does provide all the legal licensing contract services for our Global Licensing of the Garfield brand and of course all other legal issues for our company,” said Tom Greiwe via e-mail. Greiwe is a certified public accountant who serves as chief financial officer for Paws and works directly with Beasley. 

“Beyond this and more importantly, Bob is a member of the top level management of our company,” he added. “His input and advice are invaluable and are always sought out. He has the ability to be presented with a convoluted scenario and reduce it to a practical working conclusion. Bob is extremely respected by ownership and his fellow employees, and all of us find it a pleasure to work with him.”•

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  1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

  2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

  3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

  4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

  5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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