ILNews

Leadership in Law 2012: Brian C. Bosma

Partner, Kroger Gardis & Regas, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

April 25, 2012
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Brian Bosma (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Brian Bosma has practiced law for 28 years. But he is best known throughout the state as Indiana’s Speaker of the House of Representatives. In both his private practice and political capacity, peers describe him as strong in his beliefs, but confident enough to consider other points of view. His “keep calm and carry on” mantra has earned him a reputation as a consistent and judicious leader. Brian’s professional accomplishments, balanced with his community commitment, have made him a role model for many young lawyers.

The best advice I ever had
was from my dad, who was a WWII combat veteran, small businessman and served in the Indiana Senate for 21 years. When tough decisions came up that generally had one or both sides upset, my dad used to say “Just concentrate on doing what’s right, and let the politics shake out for itself.” My dad’s been gone for nearly 30 years, but I quote that advice at least twice a week as I am counseling legislators concerned that their actions will have adverse political consequences. It’s advice I truly try to live by.

I wish I had known when I graduated law school
that management and marketing responsibilities would be such a large part of a professional practice.

If I weren’t a lawyer, I’d be
a civil engineer. Actually, that was my undergraduate degree from Purdue, and it has assisted me greatly in my law practice which focuses on construction, environmental and municipal finance matters. There are some mornings I wake up and just feel like I have to build something.

My best stress reliever is
outdoor activities – take your pick. Depending on the season, we love to camp, backpack, horseback ride, kayak, shoot sporting clays or even sit around the fire pit in the backyard and look at the stars. I even consider yard work therapeutic, probably going back to the days when we did a lot of outdoor work in our family dairy business with my grandfather, my dad and lots of cousins. We worked hard and long and were taught to enjoy it.

The three words that best describe me are
thorough, determined, surprisingly funny (okay, that’s four words, but hey – I am a lawyer in politics).

In 2012, I’d like to
return to the remote village in Haiti that our family has been dedicated to assisting over the last three years. I hope to block the time out to join my son, who will be there for another summer, leading volunteers and assisting folks in the remote village of Chambrun, 10 kilometers outside of Port Au Prince. In a moment of weakness I agreed to lead a project to build a water tower to provide consistent clean water for our planned hospital, and that is at the top of my to do list.

In the movie about my life,
John Travolta would play me. Well, that’s my opinion anyway. My wife says Kelsey Grammer, as in Frasier. Apparently she believes I have some control issues. I’m listening…

In my community, I’m passionate about
services for the blind and visually impaired. As the founding director of Bosma Industries for the Blind (now Bosma Enterprises) and the Chairman of the Bosma Visionary Opportunities Foundation, and more importantly, the father of a son with lifetime vision challenges, Cheryl and I do all that we can to provide opportunities for those with vision challenges.

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  1. "Am I bugging you? I don't mean to bug ya." If what I wrote below is too much social philosophy for Indiana attorneys, just take ten this vacay to watch The Lego Movie with kiddies and sing along where appropriate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etzMjoH0rJw

  2. I've got some free speech to share here about who is at work via the cat's paw of the ACLU stamping out Christian observances.... 2 Thessalonians chap 2: "And we also thank God continually because, when you received the word of God, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as a human word, but as it actually is, the word of God, which is indeed at work in you who believe. For you, brothers and sisters, became imitators of God’s churches in Judea, which are in Christ Jesus: You suffered from your own people the same things those churches suffered from the Jews who killed the Lord Jesus and the prophets and also drove us out. They displease God and are hostile to everyone in their effort to keep us from speaking to the Gentiles so that they may be saved. In this way they always heap up their sins to the limit. The wrath of God has come upon them at last."

  3. Did someone not tell people who have access to the Chevy Volts that it has a gas engine and will run just like a normal car? The batteries give the Volt approximately a 40 mile range, but after that the gas engine will propel the vehicle either directly through the transmission like any other car, or gas engine recharges the batteries depending on the conditions.

  4. Catholic, Lutheran, even the Baptists nuzzling the wolf! http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/judicial-watch-documents-reveal-obama-hhs-paid-baptist-children-family-services-182129786-four-months-housing-illegal-alien-children/ YET where is the Progressivist outcry? Silent. I wonder why?

  5. Thank you, Honorable Ladies, and thank you, TIL, for this interesting interview. The most interesting question was the last one, which drew the least response. Could it be that NFP stamps are a threat to the very foundation of our common law American legal tradition, a throwback to the continental system that facilitated differing standards of justice? A throwback to Star Chamber’s protection of the landed gentry? If TIL ever again interviews this same panel, I would recommend inviting one known for voicing socio-legal dissent for the masses, maybe Welch, maybe Ogden, maybe our own John Smith? As demographics shift and our social cohesion precipitously drops, a consistent judicial core will become more and more important so that Justice and Equal Protection and Due Process are yet guiding stars. If those stars fall from our collective social horizon (and can they be seen even now through the haze of NFP opinions?) then what glue other than more NFP decisions and TRO’s and executive orders -- all backed by more and more lethally armed praetorians – will prop up our government institutions? And if and when we do arrive at such an end … will any then dare call that tyranny? Or will the cost of such dissent be too high to justify?

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