ILNews

Leadership in Law 2012: Donald R. Lundberg

Partner & Deputy General Counsel, Barnes & Thornburg, Indianapolis Indiana University Maurer School of Law

April 25, 2012
Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Don Lundberg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Donald Lundberg has been called the leading authority on the law governing lawyers. A veteran member of a profession that is, by its nature, adversarial, Don epitomizes a level of professionalism and civility that members of the plaintiffs and defense bars agree is to be emulated. While executive secretary of the Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission, he earned a reputation statewide for his intellectual, yet common sense-driven, approach to handling disciplinary matters, and he now uses those skills to represent judges, attorneys and other professionals in matters of professional responsibility.

The best advice I ever received was:
I don’t put too much stock in advice.  I care more about what people do than what they say. Some of the best modeling I ever received was from Fred Blosser, my math teacher for all four years of high school. He taught me that competition can be civil, productive and fun.

My best stress reliever is
commuting by bike. It’s a great way to make the mental transition between work and home life. I missed about five days over the winter.

I wish I had known when I graduated law school that
lawyer work has no equivalent of a semester break. To lawyers, a fresh start where everything comes to rest at once is a romantic fantasy. It is one of the great challenges in making the adjustment from the academy to professional life.

In 2012, I’d like to,
through the Indiana State Bar Association Wellness Committee, encourage lawyers to improve their personal well-being by exercising more, eating better and improving their inter-personal relationships.

If I weren’t a lawyer, I’d be
an urban planner. I love nature, but I also love cities.

The three words that best describe me are
eclectic, friendly and tolerant.

In the movie about my life, this actor would play me:
That’s easy. Gary Cole, who played Lumburgh in “Office Space.” They apparently spelled his name wrong in the credits.

In my community, I’m passionate about
the livability of my neighborhood and city.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  2. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  3. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

  4. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  5. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

ADVERTISEMENT