ILNews

Leadership in Law 2012: Donald R. Lundberg

Partner & Deputy General Counsel, Barnes & Thornburg, Indianapolis Indiana University Maurer School of Law

April 25, 2012
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Don Lundberg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Donald Lundberg has been called the leading authority on the law governing lawyers. A veteran member of a profession that is, by its nature, adversarial, Don epitomizes a level of professionalism and civility that members of the plaintiffs and defense bars agree is to be emulated. While executive secretary of the Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission, he earned a reputation statewide for his intellectual, yet common sense-driven, approach to handling disciplinary matters, and he now uses those skills to represent judges, attorneys and other professionals in matters of professional responsibility.

The best advice I ever received was:
I don’t put too much stock in advice.  I care more about what people do than what they say. Some of the best modeling I ever received was from Fred Blosser, my math teacher for all four years of high school. He taught me that competition can be civil, productive and fun.

My best stress reliever is
commuting by bike. It’s a great way to make the mental transition between work and home life. I missed about five days over the winter.

I wish I had known when I graduated law school that
lawyer work has no equivalent of a semester break. To lawyers, a fresh start where everything comes to rest at once is a romantic fantasy. It is one of the great challenges in making the adjustment from the academy to professional life.

In 2012, I’d like to,
through the Indiana State Bar Association Wellness Committee, encourage lawyers to improve their personal well-being by exercising more, eating better and improving their inter-personal relationships.

If I weren’t a lawyer, I’d be
an urban planner. I love nature, but I also love cities.

The three words that best describe me are
eclectic, friendly and tolerant.

In the movie about my life, this actor would play me:
That’s easy. Gary Cole, who played Lumburgh in “Office Space.” They apparently spelled his name wrong in the credits.

In my community, I’m passionate about
the livability of my neighborhood and city.

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  1. Future generations will be amazed that we prosecuted people for possessing a harmless plant. The New York Times came out in favor of legalization in Saturday's edition of the newspaper.

  2. Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

  3. I pd for a bankruptcy years ago with Mr Stiles and just this week received a garnishment from my pay! He never filed it even though he told me he would! Don't let this guy practice law ever again!!!

  4. Excellent initiative on the part of the AG. Thankfully someone takes action against predators taking advantage of people who have already been through the wringer. Well done!

  5. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

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