ILNews

Leadership in Law 2012: Elizabeth Schuerman

Associate, Bose McKinney & Evans, Indianapolis Southern Illinois University School of Law

April 25, 2012
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Elizabeth Schuerman (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Elizabeth Schuerman has quickly made a lasting impression with her firm for her outstanding work and the level of maturity shown in her interaction with clients. She is extremely passionate about the local community and volunteers with Heritage Place and the United Way of Central Indiana. The medical malpractice defense and litigation attorney is also active in the Indiana State and Indianapolis bar associations.

My long-term career goal is
to keep finding joy in my work. Right now, I really love what I do. I’ve got great clients and I’m challenged every day. This is incredibly satisfying and I hope I never lose this enthusiasm for my career.

The three words that best describe me are
energetic, passionate and loyal.

If I weren’t an attorney, I’d be
a bookstore owner.

In 2012, I’d like to
continue to improve in every aspect of my life. Obviously, I want to work toward being the best possible advocate for my clients, but I also want to invest time in myself, be a good partner to my husband, and be a good mother to my son. You know – I want to do everything!

The best advice I could give a recent law school graduate is
be open to any and all experiences within the legal profession. Even if it is not the type of law that you envision yourself practicing, I’ve found that being able to say “I’ve done that before,” is always a positive thing. And you might just be surprised by what you enjoy!

My escape from work is
spending time with my family and running.

My mentor has taught me
the value of balance in my life. Investing in myself and spending time with my family are truly important and will help me be a better attorney.
 

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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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