ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Casey C. Kannenberg

Associate, Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP, Indianapolis University of Iowa College of Law

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casey-kannenberg02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Casey C. Kannenberg, still in the early stages of his career, has already made a lasting impression at his firm as a litigation associate and in the community through high-caliber work. Casey strives to be a “complete” attorney, which to him is a person who is an excellent lawyer and integral player in the legal profession and community at large. Casey is active in the Indiana State Bar Association, serving as secretary/treasurer in 2013 for the Young Lawyers Section. He also serves as chair of the Randall T. Shepard Art Project Steering Committee, which was developed through the ISBA’s Leadership Development Academy. The committee is working toward installing an interactive art project in an Evansville park that both honors the former Indiana chief justice and on which children can play.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why? 
Thurgood Marshall, he was our country’s consummate advocate for justice and equality.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
Real Property. I hope to never encounter the rule against perpetuities in my practice.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
It might be more peaceful and carefree, but we would all go crazy not being able to instantaneously Google the name of the movie you are watching right now to find out that actor’s name, who you swear was in some other movie you saw a couple weeks ago.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
I certainly hope that there are Denny Cranes and Alan Shores out there somewhere. Most courtroom antics are not that colorful and legendary, however.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
The Make-a-Wish Foundation.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
The common theme among those who I consider mentors is civility in the practice of law.

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  1. Your article is a good intro the recent amendments to Fed.R.Civ.P. For a much longer - though not necessarily better -- summary, counsel might want to read THE CHIEF UMPIRE IS CHANGING THE STRIKE ZONE, which I co-authored and which was just published in the January issue of THE VERDICT (the monthly publication of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association).

  2. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  3. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  4. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  5. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

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