ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Dustin R. DeNeal

Associate, Faegre Baker Daniels LLP, Indianapolis Indiana University Maurer School of Law

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dustin-deneal02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

As a fifth-year associate, Dustin R. DeNeal has tackled more complex issues and difficult cases in his finance and restructuring practice than some attorneys with many more years experience. Dustin had a “baptism by fire” early in his career when he took on prominent roles in a Chapter 11 case involving a large U.S. cattle dealer and a converted Chapter 7 case involving a global musical instrument retailer.

Dustin also has developed his own side practice advising colleges and universities on bankruptcy matters. He’s active in the Indianapolis, Indiana State and American bar associations and chairs the Client Financial Assistance Fund, a committee of the ISBA that works to compensate victims of attorney dishonesty.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
Precision of thought. We do not deal with easy legal issues. Our clients call us with difficult, life-changing legal issues. We owe it to them to fully think through the situation and potential solutions before offering advice.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
I think it would be fascinating to go back and experience the shared vision and patriotism of the Constitutional Convention while hopefully fixing/adding/changing some things that would short-circuit future problems.

In life or law, what bugs you?
Generally, it’s hypocrisy. Specifically, and I know this is not a novel thought, I’m not a big fan of keeping track of my time in 6-minute increments.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Public education. I come from a family of teachers and firmly believe that we can do much more for children of all socioeconomic backgrounds by 1) making school administration more efficient and transparent, 2) fixing our school funding formula, and 3) giving all students (not just the ones who have caring parents) equal access to top-notch teachers.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
A great thing. I know this is going to come across very stone-age, but our society overvalues technology and undervalues human resources. While technology is a useful tool, it can’t replace human interaction and face-to-face consensus and relationship building. From a personal standpoint, I’d love to be able to go a day without technology.

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  1. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  2. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  3. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

  4. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  5. This article proved very enlightening. Right ahead of sitting the LSAT for the first time, I felt a sense of relief that a score of 141 was admitted to an Indiana Law School and did well under unique circumstances. While my GPA is currently 3.91 I fear standardized testing and hope that I too will get a good enough grade for acceptance here at home. Thanks so much for this informative post.

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