ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Hon. Lloyd Mark Bailey

Judge, Indiana Court of Appeals, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

 

mark-bailey02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Indiana Court of Appeals Judge L. Mark Bailey has come a long way from his college days when he worked as a courier in a law firm to get exposure to the legal system. His career path has taken him from a small firm and a solo practice to serving as an administrative law judge, state trial judge, and now a jurist on the Court of Appeals. Mark, along with Judges John Baker and Edward Najam, initiated the “Appeals on Wheels” project that brings appellate arguments into community settings. While serving on the bench, he has earned his master’s in business administration from Indiana Wesleyan University. He continues to seek out learning opportunities – in 2009, the judge earned a designation as an Advanced Science & Technology Adjudication Resource Center Science and Technology Fellow. Mark’s ability to blend legal, social and public policy analysis is admired by his colleagues.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Meaningful access to justice.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would return to the family farm.

In life or law, what bugs you?
A sense by some people that life is just a dress rehearsal which allows them to traipse through it without any sense of personal meaning or purpose.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Thurgood Marshall. I can’t think of a better person to provide unique insight, understanding and perspective on the role of law in our society.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
Every class presented its own unique challenges. The goal for me was to master the unique terminology for each subject and to understand its boundaries, history and purpose in our society.

What do you find scary?
Missing a deadline.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
Follow Stephen Decatur to battle in the Barbary Wars on the open seas of North Africa.

What advice would you give your 25-year-old self?
Read Stephen R. Covey’s book, “7 Habits of Highly Effective People” and “prepare to begin!”

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?
Fully understand the reasons for each person’s perspective.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Bright Side of the Road,” by Van Morrison. From my perspective, the song reflects a great life with my wife of 29 years and counting.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
It is what it is. Just because it’s there doesn’t mean it has to be engaged 24/7.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
“The Good Wife.” It depicts real issues involving lawyers, their clients and their practices. The resolution of those issues is not so realistic. Most legal issues unfold over a period of time, not in an hour from beginning to end including commercial breaks. Additionally, wouldn’t it be nice if we could truly write the script for each client’s case.
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

ADVERTISEMENT