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Leadership in Law 2013: Hon. Lloyd Mark Bailey

Judge, Indiana Court of Appeals, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

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mark-bailey02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Indiana Court of Appeals Judge L. Mark Bailey has come a long way from his college days when he worked as a courier in a law firm to get exposure to the legal system. His career path has taken him from a small firm and a solo practice to serving as an administrative law judge, state trial judge, and now a jurist on the Court of Appeals. Mark, along with Judges John Baker and Edward Najam, initiated the “Appeals on Wheels” project that brings appellate arguments into community settings. While serving on the bench, he has earned his master’s in business administration from Indiana Wesleyan University. He continues to seek out learning opportunities – in 2009, the judge earned a designation as an Advanced Science & Technology Adjudication Resource Center Science and Technology Fellow. Mark’s ability to blend legal, social and public policy analysis is admired by his colleagues.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Meaningful access to justice.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would return to the family farm.

In life or law, what bugs you?
A sense by some people that life is just a dress rehearsal which allows them to traipse through it without any sense of personal meaning or purpose.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Thurgood Marshall. I can’t think of a better person to provide unique insight, understanding and perspective on the role of law in our society.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
Every class presented its own unique challenges. The goal for me was to master the unique terminology for each subject and to understand its boundaries, history and purpose in our society.

What do you find scary?
Missing a deadline.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
Follow Stephen Decatur to battle in the Barbary Wars on the open seas of North Africa.

What advice would you give your 25-year-old self?
Read Stephen R. Covey’s book, “7 Habits of Highly Effective People” and “prepare to begin!”

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?
Fully understand the reasons for each person’s perspective.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Bright Side of the Road,” by Van Morrison. From my perspective, the song reflects a great life with my wife of 29 years and counting.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
It is what it is. Just because it’s there doesn’t mean it has to be engaged 24/7.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
“The Good Wife.” It depicts real issues involving lawyers, their clients and their practices. The resolution of those issues is not so realistic. Most legal issues unfold over a period of time, not in an hour from beginning to end including commercial breaks. Additionally, wouldn’t it be nice if we could truly write the script for each client’s case.
 

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  1. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  2. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

  3. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

  4. Seventh Circuit Court Judge Diane Wood has stated in “The Rule of Law in Times of Stress” (2003), “that neither laws nor the procedures used to create or implement them should be secret; and . . . the laws must not be arbitrary.” According to the American Bar Association, Wood’s quote drives home this point: The rule of law also requires that people can expect predictable results from the legal system; this is what Judge Wood implies when she says that “the laws must not be arbitrary.” Predictable results mean that people who act in the same way can expect the law to treat them in the same way. If similar actions do not produce similar legal outcomes, people cannot use the law to guide their actions, and a “rule of law” does not exist.

  5. Linda, I sure hope you are not seeking a law license, for such eighteenth century sentiments could result in your denial in some jurisdictions minting attorneys for our tolerant and inclusive profession.

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