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Leadership in Law 2013: Joseph R. Fullenkamp

Partner, Barnes & Thornburg LLP, South Bend University of Iowa College of Law

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fullenkamp-6877-joseph-15col.jpg (IL Photo/Shephard Imageworks, Mark Shephard)

Joseph R. Fullenkamp is an active leader within his firm and devoted to his community, setting the bar for what attorneys everywhere should strive to accomplish. The litigator served on the firm’s management committee from 2008 to 2010 and now serves as the litigation department administrator for the South Bend/Elkhart offices. Joe also spends a significant amount of time mentoring associates and other attorneys who seek him out for professional advice and input regarding work/life balance and career advancement. Joe is immediate past-president of the St. Joseph County Bar Association and has served on the bar association’s board of governors since 2005. He helped form the SJCBA’s Judicial Survey Committee, which polls members anonymously about sitting county judges. He continues to serve as committee chair.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Nelson Mandela. I admire his commitment to and personal sacrifice for social justice in South Africa. After his release from 27 years of imprisonment, he was able to negotiate the end of apartheid and the establishment of multi-racial elections in South Africa with the same government that imprisoned him.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
A fishing guide on Leech Lake in Minnesota.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
1804. I’d join the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
When my local bar term ends, I’d like to get involved in refugee resettlement and asylum.

In life or law, what bugs you?
It seems like we all say that people need to work together and compromise to solve difficult issues – “but only if it doesn’t affect me.”

What do you find scary?
The thought of our four boys as adults.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
No. However, when I interned with the Linn County (Iowa) Prosecutor’s Office, I used a line from “Matlock” to convince a judge to overrule an objection by the defendant’s counsel in a suppression hearing.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“In Heaven There is no Beer” reminds me of my Iowa German-Catholic hometown, is played by the Hawkeye Marching Band at football and basketball games, and describes enjoying friends and experiencing life (in moderation).  

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
Not being connected 24/7 would be good. Immediate access has some benefits, but we have lost the opportunity to take time to think through an issue before we respond. 

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
In what was supposed to be an easy final semester at the University of Iowa, after already accepting a position at Barnes & Thornburg in Indiana, I learned that I was 1 hour short of Indiana’s 6-hour civil procedure requirement. I had to add Advanced Civil Procedure when the semester was already half over. Now I realize that it was my most helpful class.

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  1. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  2. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

  3. This outbreak illustrates the absurdity of the extreme positions taken by today's liberalism, specifically individualism and the modern cult of endless personal "freedom." Ebola reminds us that at some point the person's own "freedom" to do this and that comes into contact with the needs of the common good and "freedom" must be curtailed. This is not rocket science, except, today there is nonstop propaganda elevating individual preferences over the common good, so some pundits have a hard time fathoming the obvious necessity of quarantine in some situations....or even NATIONAL BORDERS...propagandists have also amazingly used this as another chance to accuse Western nations of "racism" which is preposterous and offensive. So one the one hand the idolatry of individualism has to stop and on the other hand facts people don't like that intersect with race-- remain facts nonetheless. People who respond to facts over propaganda do better in the long run. We call it Truth. Sometimes it seems hard to find.

  4. It would be hard not to feel the Kramers' anguish. But Catholic Charities, by definition, performed due diligence and held to the statutory standard of care. No good can come from punishing them for doing their duty. Should Indiana wish to change its laws regarding adoption agreements and or putative fathers, the place for that is the legislature and can only apply to future cases. We do not apply new laws to past actions, as the Kramers seem intent on doing, to no helpful end.

  5. I am saddened to hear about the loss of Zeff Weiss. He was an outstanding member of the Indianapolis legal community. My thoughts are with his family.

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