Leadership in Law 2013: Josh S. Tatum

Associate, Plews Shadley Racher & Braun LLP, Indianapolis Vanderbilt University Law School

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josh-tatum02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Since he was 12 years old, Josh S. Tatum has known he wanted to be an attorney because the lawyers he knew were some of the finest people he encountered. His sense of ethical commitment is highlighted by his graduating from school with a Juris Doctor and a Master’s in Divinity. Josh practices in appeals, participating in more than 35 cases before state and federal appellate courts in just two years of practice. He is especially proud of the amicus brief he authored in the Indiana school voucher case that the Indiana Supreme Court ruled on in March 2013. Josh is bright, able and enthusiastic and is considered by his mentor George Plews as someone who will have a longstanding and significant impact on the legal community.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
President of Wabash College. Wabash is an institution that changed my life starting with my enrollment and continuing today. The faculty, fellow alumni, friends and family have been a close community that challenged me to shape my identity more than any other. It’s my fantasy job because it would be a thrill to help lead that community in striving toward its mission.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
I would meet my first ancestors who immigrated to the United States and learn about what motivated them to make such a dramatic change in their lives.

In life or law, what bugs you?
Bad writing.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Abraham Lincoln. His writing and rhetoric are the most concise and powerful I have come across from any lawyer. I’d love to talk to him about how he developed closing arguments, brought cases to resolution, and drafted his speeches. His great accomplishments as president too often overshadow his great skill as an attorney.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?
The ability to slow down time.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
Kindness demonstrates strength rather than weakness.

What do you find scary?
Student loans.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Indiana YMCA Youth and Government. It’s a civic-education program that brings high-school students from across the state to participate in a model government at the Indiana Statehouse for a weekend. Students play the roles of legislators, the governor, secretary of state, Supreme Court justices, media correspondents and others. My wife and I are alumni of the program and both want young Hoosiers to internalize the Y’s values and Youth and Government’s motto, “Democracy must be learned by each generation.”

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Back Home Again in Indiana.”

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
I’m agnostic on this. Electronics can be used for good or bad. Technology has always posed problems. Advances in metallurgy made for better plows and for better weapons. The printing press similarly had two sides. “Technology” is just another aspect of life we have to deal with.


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  1. Lori, you must really love wedding cake stories like this one ... happy enuf ending for you?

  2. This new language about a warning has not been discussed at previous meetings. It's not available online. Since it must be made public knowledge before the vote, does anyone know exactly what it says? Further, this proposal was held up for 5 weeks because members Carol and Lucy insisted that all terms used be defined. So now, definitions are unnecessary and have not been inserted? Beyond these requirements, what is the logic behind giving one free pass to discriminators? Is that how laws work - break it once and that's ok? Just don't do it again? Three members of Carmel's council have done just about everything they can think of to prohibit an anti-discrimination ordinance in Carmel, much to Brainard's consternation, I'm told. These three 'want to be so careful' that they have failed to do what at least 13 other communities, including Martinsville, have already done. It's not being careful. It's standing in the way of what 60% of Carmel residents want. It's hurting CArmel in thT businesses have refused to locate because the council has not gotten with the program. And now they want to give discriminatory one free shot to do so. Unacceptable. Once three members leave the council because they lost their races, the Carmel council will have unanimous approval of the ordinance as originally drafted, not with a one free shot to discriminate freebie. That happens in January 2016. Why give a freebie when all we have to do is wait 3 months and get an ordinance with teeth from Day 1? If nothing else, can you please get s copy from Carmel and post it so we can see what else has changed in the proposal?

  3. Here is an interesting 2012 law review article for any who wish to dive deeper into this subject matter: Excerpt: "Judicial interpretation of the ADA has extended public entity liability to licensing agencies in the licensure and certification of attorneys.49 State bar examiners have the authority to conduct fitness investigations for the purpose of determining whether an applicant is a direct threat to the public.50 A “direct threat” is defined as “a significant risk to the health or safety of others that cannot be eliminated by a modification of policies, practices or procedures, or by the provision of auxiliary aids or services as provided by § 35.139.”51 However, bar examiners may not utilize generalizations or stereotypes about the applicant’s disability in concluding that an applicant is a direct threat.52"

  4. We have been on the waiting list since 2009, i was notified almost 4 months ago that we were going to start receiving payments and we still have received nothing. Every time I call I'm told I just have to wait it's in the lawyers hands. Is everyone else still waiting?

  5. I hope you dont mind but to answer my question. What amendment does this case pretain to?