Leadership in Law 2013: Larry J. Stroble

Partner, Barnes & Thornburg LLP, Indianapolis Indiana University Maurer School of Law

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larry-stroble01-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Larry J. Stroble is well known and respected statewide for his Indiana and federal tax expertise and accomplishments. A successful federal tax litigator, Larry argued and won a case before the Supreme Court of the United States that had more than $300 million of taxes at stake nationwide. His knowledge has made him a valuable resource not only within his firm, but for the Indiana and Indianapolis chambers of commerce and many other employer-based organizations. He is a highly regarded mentor to young attorneys, not just those who aspire to practice tax law. Larry also works on a pro bono basis drafting tax legislation, testifying at legislative hearings on the state’s tax system, and he has served as a member and chair of the Indiana Tax Court Liaison Committee.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose? 
Investigative reporter. 

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why? 
Clarence Darrow, because he would have some interesting tales to tell (Wobblies, Debs, Leopold and Loeb, Scopes, etc.). 

What class in law school did you find the most difficult? 

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
Very rarely. Surprisingly, I thought that “My Cousin Vinny” had a somewhat realistic depiction of certain aspects of trial practice.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you? 
Stop and smell the roses. I wish I had listened to him.  

What advice would you give your 25-year-old self?
Party hearty, but be in bed when the rooster crows. 

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do? 
The Roaring ’20s might be nice. Maybe I’d visit a speakeasy or two and try to make money in the stock market and get out just before the crash.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be? 
The power to think several steps ahead of everyone else.

In life or law, what bugs you? 
Petty bureaucratic functionaries who use their limited power to try to make other people’s lives difficult.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be? 
“Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” by the Animals. 

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing? 
Although civilization got by without it for 9,990 years, I think the technology is a good thing. 

What do you find scary? 
A collision with an asteroid like the one that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. It devastated the entire North American continent, leading to the extermination of most of its fauna and flora and unleashing global nuclear winter.

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it? 
“The Stroblewich” – ham, cheese, and egg without fat, cholesterol or other unhealthy attributes.


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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.