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Leadership in Law 2013: Oni N. Harton

Associate, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

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oni-harton01-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Oni N. Harton’s career is on an upward trajectory. Oni, who practices in the litigation, appellate and insurance groups, has been recognized by her firm for successes on behalf of her clients, receiving the Rainmaker Award and the Appellate Advocacy Award. She attended law school as a fellow of the Indiana Conference for Legal Education Opportunity and received multiple honors for her academic achievement. Before joining Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, Oni clerked for former Indiana Justice Frank Sullivan Jr., who said he was extremely impressed by her intelligence, warm personality and ethical standards. Oni is active on several firm committees and participates in the Indianapolis Bar Association’s Pro Bono Hospice Program and Low Asset Will Program.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
Think it through. That is, not to jump in and start working on a problem thinking it will save time and money, but to think through the process before I start. The extra time spent on the front end will result in time saved in the back end.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would choose not to work at a “job.” Rather, I’d be a stay-at-home mom and community volunteer.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Sandra Day O’Connor. She’s not only a great legal mind and a pioneer but also seems plain-spoken and humorous, yet enigmatic.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
It’s asking a lot (and I’m certainly not worthy) but I’d go back to “In the beginning.” I’d also request the sensory capability to take it all in for several days.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Family preservation and promotion.

In life or law, what bugs you?
When there’s something that we can do to minimize the effects of unfairness or “bad luck” in people’s lives but fail to do so.

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
“The Flow.” It’s a sandwich that uses the best ingredients working together to create gustatory bliss. My choices would be pesto, provolone cheese, tomato, fresh spinach or lettuce, avocado and a squirt of olive oil between toasted Ezekiel bread.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Unwritten.”

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  1. Someone off their meds? C'mon John, it is called the politics of Empire. Get with the program, will ya? How can we build one world under secularist ideals without breaking a few eggs? Of course, once it is fully built, is the American public who will feel the deadly grip of the velvet glove. One cannot lay down with dogs without getting fleas. The cup of wrath is nearly full, John Smith, nearly full. Oops, there I go, almost sounding as alarmist as Smith. Guess he and I both need to listen to this again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRnQ65J02XA

  2. Charles Rice was one of the greatest of the so-called great generation in America. I was privileged to count him among my mentors. He stood firm for Christ and Christ's Church in the Spirit of Thomas More, always quick to be a good servant of the King, but always God's first. I had Rice come speak to 700 in Fort Wayne as Obama took office. Rice was concerned that this rise of aggressive secularism and militant Islam were dual threats to Christendom,er, please forgive, I meant to say "Western Civilization". RIP Charlie. You are safe at home.

  3. It's a big fat black mark against the US that they radicalized a lot of these Afghan jihadis in the 80s to fight the soviets and then when they predictably got around to biting the hand that fed them, the US had to invade their homelands, install a bunch of corrupt drug kingpins and kleptocrats, take these guys and torture the hell out of them. Why for example did the US have to sodomize them? Dubya said "they hate us for our freedoms!" Here, try some of that freedom whether you like it or not!!! Now they got even more reasons to hate us-- lets just keep bombing the crap out of their populations, installing more puppet regimes, arming one faction against another, etc etc etc.... the US is becoming a monster. No wonder they hate us. Here's my modest recommendation. How about we follow "Just War" theory in the future. St Augustine had it right. How about we treat these obvious prisoners of war according to the Geneva convention instead of torturing them in sadistic and perverted ways.

  4. As usual, John is "spot-on." The subtle but poignant points he makes are numerous and warrant reflection by mediators and users. Oh but were it so simple.

  5. ACLU. Way to step up against the police state. I see a lot of things from the ACLU I don't like but this one is a gold star in its column.... instead of fighting it the authorities should apologize and back off.

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