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Leadership in Law 2013: Oni N. Harton

Associate, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

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oni-harton01-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Oni N. Harton’s career is on an upward trajectory. Oni, who practices in the litigation, appellate and insurance groups, has been recognized by her firm for successes on behalf of her clients, receiving the Rainmaker Award and the Appellate Advocacy Award. She attended law school as a fellow of the Indiana Conference for Legal Education Opportunity and received multiple honors for her academic achievement. Before joining Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, Oni clerked for former Indiana Justice Frank Sullivan Jr., who said he was extremely impressed by her intelligence, warm personality and ethical standards. Oni is active on several firm committees and participates in the Indianapolis Bar Association’s Pro Bono Hospice Program and Low Asset Will Program.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
Think it through. That is, not to jump in and start working on a problem thinking it will save time and money, but to think through the process before I start. The extra time spent on the front end will result in time saved in the back end.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would choose not to work at a “job.” Rather, I’d be a stay-at-home mom and community volunteer.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Sandra Day O’Connor. She’s not only a great legal mind and a pioneer but also seems plain-spoken and humorous, yet enigmatic.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
It’s asking a lot (and I’m certainly not worthy) but I’d go back to “In the beginning.” I’d also request the sensory capability to take it all in for several days.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Family preservation and promotion.

In life or law, what bugs you?
When there’s something that we can do to minimize the effects of unfairness or “bad luck” in people’s lives but fail to do so.

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
“The Flow.” It’s a sandwich that uses the best ingredients working together to create gustatory bliss. My choices would be pesto, provolone cheese, tomato, fresh spinach or lettuce, avocado and a squirt of olive oil between toasted Ezekiel bread.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Unwritten.”

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  1. Just an aside, but regardless of the outcome, I 'm proud of Judge William Hughes. He was the original magistrate on the Home place issue. He ruled for Home Place, and was primaried by Brainard for it. Their tool Poindexter failed to unseat Hughes, who won support for his honesty and courage throughout the county, and he was reelected Judge of Hamilton County's Superior Court. You can still stand for something and survive. Thanks, Judge Hughes!

  2. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  3. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  4. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  5. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

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