ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Rhett L. Tauber

Senior Partner, Tauber Law Offices, Schererville Valparaiso University Law School

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

 

tauber-rhett-7036-15col.jpg (IL Photo/Shephard Imageworks, Mark Shephard)

Rhett L. Tauber is admired as not only a skilled school attorney, but also as a leader in his community. There isn’t a facet of the town of Highland that Rhett has not influenced. He has served as the town attorney for more than 30 years and has been instrumental in moving it forward. Some consider him “reminiscent of the way lawyers used to be: a strong advocate for his client yet always courteous to the other party’s point of view.” Rhett is an effective mentor who has an open-door policy, always making time and providing counsel without being overbearing or condescending. In addition to his work for the town of Highland, Rhett practices law with his son Jared Tauber and daughter Tara Tauber.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
John Grisham. He’s a very well-rounded and successful individual, and he’s the perfect example of how your law license can be used in many different ways.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
The development of recreational activities and opportunities for the youth in my hometown of Highland, Indiana.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would be captain of a boat in the Caribbean.

You practice law with your children. What one piece of advice would you give to those considering working with family members?
Working with family members is very rewarding, but it also has challenges. You should always expect the same level of work ethic, productivity and professionalism from family members as you do from your non-related partners and employees.

What advice would you give your 25-year-old self?
Besides your family, you should cherish your law license more than anything else. To be successful in the practice of law you need to be ethical, hard working, productive and, most importantly, give your best effort in representing clients day in and day out.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Small Town” by John Mellencamp.

In life or law, what bugs you?
Lack of preparation.

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
“Rhett Butler” club sandwich – turkey, ham, lettuce, cheese, tomato, mayo, bacon, fried egg on toasted wheat bread.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
It would be a bad thing. 24/7 technology has given us greater opportunities in life as well as in business, including the practice of law. It’s hard to remember how we were able to easily communicate with people without smart phones and email, although I spent the majority of my career without them.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
Although I enjoy television, watching shows centered around lawyers and their practices, I have not found any of them to be realistic.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

ADVERTISEMENT