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Leadership in Law 2013: Sarah B. Dauer

In-house counsel, Shoe Carnival Inc., Evansville University of Tulsa College of Law

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dauer-sarah3-15col.jpg (IL Photo/DIA Photography, David Greene)

When Sarah B. Dauer relocated to Evansville to work for Shoe Carnival Inc., she immediately contacted the Evansville Bar Association asking to join and how she can be involved. She’s become a regular attendee and brought other young attorneys to EBA events. A colleague describes her as one of the finest leaders and young professionals he’s yet observed in a legal capacity or otherwise. When Shoe Carnival’s senior vice president and in-house counsel was away for six months in 2011, Sarah carried sole responsibility for legal support for the company. Sarah is a former commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?  
I have my dream job. I love the law! I could, however, be persuaded to work from a backpack while globe trekking.

What civic cause is the most important to you?  
Respect for life – to end abuse of children, animals, each other, ourselves. To increase our respect for all life and appreciate the necessity of others’ well-being to our own.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?  
To “[d]well in Possibility….” (Emily Dickinson).

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
It’d be a bourbon and coke – caffeinated, bubbly and a little rough around the edges.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be? 
“Paradise” by Coldplay.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
I would go back to yesterday and get more rest!

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
Both. Work with what you’ve got!

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?  
Jurisprudence. A background in philosophy was a pre-req for success, and I didn’t have one.

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  1. That comment on this e-site, which reports on every building, courtroom or even insignificant social movement by beltway sycophants as being named to honor the yet-quite-alive former chief judge, is truly laughable!

  2. Is this a social parallel to the Mosby prosecutions in Baltimore? Progressive ideology ever seeks Pilgrims to burn at the stake. (I should know.)

  3. The Conour embarrassment is an example of why it would be a good idea to NOT name public buildings or to erect monuments to "worthy" people until AFTER they have been dead three years, at least. And we also need to stop naming federal buildings and roads after a worthless politician whose only achievement was getting elected multiple times (like a certain Congressman after whom we renamed the largest post office in the state). Also, why have we renamed BOTH the Center Township government center AND the new bus terminal/bum hangout after Julia Carson?

  4. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  5. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

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