Leadership in Law 2013: Sarah B. Dauer

In-house counsel, Shoe Carnival Inc., Evansville University of Tulsa College of Law

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dauer-sarah3-15col.jpg (IL Photo/DIA Photography, David Greene)

When Sarah B. Dauer relocated to Evansville to work for Shoe Carnival Inc., she immediately contacted the Evansville Bar Association asking to join and how she can be involved. She’s become a regular attendee and brought other young attorneys to EBA events. A colleague describes her as one of the finest leaders and young professionals he’s yet observed in a legal capacity or otherwise. When Shoe Carnival’s senior vice president and in-house counsel was away for six months in 2011, Sarah carried sole responsibility for legal support for the company. Sarah is a former commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?  
I have my dream job. I love the law! I could, however, be persuaded to work from a backpack while globe trekking.

What civic cause is the most important to you?  
Respect for life – to end abuse of children, animals, each other, ourselves. To increase our respect for all life and appreciate the necessity of others’ well-being to our own.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?  
To “[d]well in Possibility….” (Emily Dickinson).

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
It’d be a bourbon and coke – caffeinated, bubbly and a little rough around the edges.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be? 
“Paradise” by Coldplay.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
I would go back to yesterday and get more rest!

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
Both. Work with what you’ve got!

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?  
Jurisprudence. A background in philosophy was a pre-req for success, and I didn’t have one.


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  1. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  2. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  3. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  4. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.

  5. rensselaer imdiana is doing same thing to children from the judge to attorney and dfs staff they need to be investigated as well