ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Timothy A. Emerick

Associate, Barnes & Thornburg LLP, South Bend Valparaiso University Law School

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emerick-tim-6901-15col.jpg (IL Photo/Shephard Imageworks, Mark Shephard)

When Timothy A. Emerick participated in a Masters of Accounting program at the University of Illinois, he convinced the law school to allow him to take a course as an elective. After his first class, the certified public accountant knew that law school was in his future. His CPA experience is invaluable to his legal practice that focuses on mergers and acquisitions, financings and real estate transactions. Each year, he volunteers at the University of Notre Dame/St. Mary’s Tax Assistance program, providing free income tax preparation to low-income families. Tim has also assisted with numerous general corporate and real estate matters for nonprofits on a pro bono basis.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
I would like to spend a day with Tim Russert. His life story is impressive and inspiring.

What do you find scary?
The tendency for our society to run to the extremes and refuse to be reasonable and cooperate. From playgrounds to Washington, the trend seems to be for everyone to dig in their heels and hold onto their positions at all costs, a dangerous trend.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
Think long-term. With a legal career that will hopefully span nearly 40 years, a few bad days are bound to happen. That’s hard to remember some days, but great advice.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
I’m a member of the board of Unity Gardens Inc., an organization that strives to “grow” stronger communities while providing everyone access to affordable, healthy food.

In life or law, what bugs you?
Inconsiderate and selfish people.

If a drink or sandwich were to be named after you, what would it be called and what would be in it?
“The InTiminator” – grilled cheese on rye with tomato, bacon and pesto.

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  1. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  2. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  3. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  4. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  5. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

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