ILNews

Leadership in Law 2013: Weston E. Overturf

Associate, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, Indianapolis University of Dayton School of Law

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weston-overturf01-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Weston E. Overturf stands out among his peers in the bankruptcy bar due to his significant experience representing both creditors and debtors in complex business restructurings. He’s also been able to argue a variety of issues before the federal courts in Indiana and has risen to become a key player in the firm for his outstanding work. He is known to avoid taking his work on cases unnecessarily personal – something all too easy for newer lawyers to do. Weston has frequently volunteered with the Ask-a-Lawyer program and is active in the Noblesville Swim Club.

What’s the most important thing your mentor has taught you?
The process and preparation of a task or matter is very often more important than the legal aspects and/or outcome.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Education and mentoring of young people.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“‘Till I Collapse.”

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
Management/executive in the New York Yankees organization (of course if I got that job the sabbatical would last much longer than one year!); an IndyCar driver; or in a more realistic world – high school soccer/swim coach.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
Constitutional Law.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
None that I have ever seen. … None of them show the actual amount of work that goes into taking a position in a matter or making a legal argument – the preparation is the most important part and the least “sexy” part of the practice of law.

In life or law, what bugs you?
People who lack respect for others around them.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?
The ability to freeze time.

What do you find scary?
Failure.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
Back to the Future.

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  1. Is this a social parallel to the Mosby prosecutions in Baltimore? Progressive ideology ever seeks Pilgrims to burn at the stake. (I should know.)

  2. The Conour embarrassment is an example of why it would be a good idea to NOT name public buildings or to erect monuments to "worthy" people until AFTER they have been dead three years, at least. And we also need to stop naming federal buildings and roads after a worthless politician whose only achievement was getting elected multiple times (like a certain Congressman after whom we renamed the largest post office in the state). Also, why have we renamed BOTH the Center Township government center AND the new bus terminal/bum hangout after Julia Carson?

  3. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  4. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  5. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

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