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Leadership in Law 2014: Crystal Spivey Wildeman

Associate, Kahn Dees Donovan & Kahn LLP, Evansville • DePaul University College of Law, 2006

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15col-Wildeman.jpg Crystal Spivey Wildeman(Photo Submitted)

Crystal Spivey Wildeman enhances her community and firm every day with her positive, can-do attitude. She inspires others to do and be their very best and seems unable to give any less than 100 percent to the task at hand. While confident in her own ability, this up-and-coming litigator is eager to soak up the wisdom offered from more experienced attorneys. Crystal has extensive trial experience in Indiana and Illinois and often handles matters involving products liability, landlord-tenant, and employment litigation.

You’re licensed to practice in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. Which of the three bar exams was the most difficult?

I’d have to say that the Illinois bar exam was the most difficult. I recall the issues that were covered in the essay questions that particular year seemed more unexpected and obscure than those on the Indiana and Kentucky exams. Also, Illinois procedure can be complicated. There are not just civil rules of practice but also Supreme Court rules, local rules, and statutes that might all be relevant to any one issue.

What was the worst or most memorable job you had prior to becoming an attorney?

The most memorable job I had was working as a juvenile field probation officer for an Indiana criminal justice pilot program in Monroe County while in college. My job was to randomly check on the offenders ... and then report to the court on their compliance. Most of the kids in the program were from majorly dysfunctional homes. Now, more than a decade later, I still think about some of those kids, which motivates me to dedicate myself to at-risk youth causes.

What are some tips for achieving a work/life balance?

I’m still figuring it out! But, advice I once heard that I have found definitely rings true is that the most important career decision you’ll ever make is whom you choose to marry. I think in order to have balance in our profession, you have to have a spouse who is 100 percent on board with both your family and career goals. I’m very blessed to have that.

What’s something about you not many people know?

I’m an NRA lifetime member.


Why practice in the area of law that you do?

I love to be challenged and I love to learn, which makes practicing civil litigation a natural fit. Every new project and each new person brings both the challenge and the opportunity to learn. I enjoy taking a unique set of circumstances and applying my experience and the law to achieve our goal. As a bonus, I learn something new each time.

What class do you wish you could have skipped in law school?

I attended law school in Chicago. The class that required me to wait for the el for what seemed like an eternity in the frigid, whipping winds in the winter months at 6:00 a.m. … yes, that class, I would’ve been glad to skip!

What is the most important lesson you learned from your mentor?

It isn’t a “client,” or a “case,” or a “matter.” They’re people. If you care, listen well, take their problems on as your own and do good work, you’ll never have to worry about having “clients.” Instead, you’ll always be busy and have long-term friends that happen to call you their lawyer.

What civic cause is the most important to you?

I am most passionate about civic causes that focus on youth and the family, such as Youth First Inc., of which I am a board member. The family is the most basic unit of society, which means it is the first defense against most of society’s struggles. Investing in causes that emphasize, promote and strengthen the family and, by extension, the children within that family, leads to stronger communities which, in turn, effect change in society as a whole.

If you couldn’t be a lawyer, what would you do for a living?

A novelist because I love storytelling, or possibly, an event planner because I love to plan and host parties for my friends and children.

What’s your guilty pleasure?

I don’t know if it would be considered a “guilty pleasure,” but I don’t think anything makes me happier than reading stories to my daughters. I also love going to antique stores, flea markets, rummage sales and consignment shops to find discarded old things I can change into something else. I call it “treasure hunting.”

Why do you think people often have negative stereotypes about lawyers?

According to my experience, the overwhelming majority of attorneys are admirable, ethical and professional. They’re leaders in their community and do impressive work inside and outside of the office. However, there is a slim minority of attorneys who, in their quest to win and to be the best, have gone too far. I believe that the poor decision making of these few has led to negative stereotypes about the profession as a whole.

If you could meet and spend the day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?

Abe Lincoln, because I find his writing and reasoning to be so simple yet brilliant. I have three of his quotes posted in my office, including my favorite: “Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other one thing.”

Who is your favorite fictional lawyer?

Jack Brigance in “A Time to Kill” because of the compelling closing argument he delivered to the jury. I haven’t had a chance to read “Sycamore Row,” the sequel.


 

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  1. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  2. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  3. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  4. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

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