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Leadership in Law 2014: Crystal Spivey Wildeman

Associate, Kahn Dees Donovan & Kahn LLP, Evansville • DePaul University College of Law, 2006

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15col-Wildeman.jpg Crystal Spivey Wildeman(Photo Submitted)

Crystal Spivey Wildeman enhances her community and firm every day with her positive, can-do attitude. She inspires others to do and be their very best and seems unable to give any less than 100 percent to the task at hand. While confident in her own ability, this up-and-coming litigator is eager to soak up the wisdom offered from more experienced attorneys. Crystal has extensive trial experience in Indiana and Illinois and often handles matters involving products liability, landlord-tenant, and employment litigation.

You’re licensed to practice in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. Which of the three bar exams was the most difficult?

I’d have to say that the Illinois bar exam was the most difficult. I recall the issues that were covered in the essay questions that particular year seemed more unexpected and obscure than those on the Indiana and Kentucky exams. Also, Illinois procedure can be complicated. There are not just civil rules of practice but also Supreme Court rules, local rules, and statutes that might all be relevant to any one issue.

What was the worst or most memorable job you had prior to becoming an attorney?

The most memorable job I had was working as a juvenile field probation officer for an Indiana criminal justice pilot program in Monroe County while in college. My job was to randomly check on the offenders ... and then report to the court on their compliance. Most of the kids in the program were from majorly dysfunctional homes. Now, more than a decade later, I still think about some of those kids, which motivates me to dedicate myself to at-risk youth causes.

What are some tips for achieving a work/life balance?

I’m still figuring it out! But, advice I once heard that I have found definitely rings true is that the most important career decision you’ll ever make is whom you choose to marry. I think in order to have balance in our profession, you have to have a spouse who is 100 percent on board with both your family and career goals. I’m very blessed to have that.

What’s something about you not many people know?

I’m an NRA lifetime member.


Why practice in the area of law that you do?

I love to be challenged and I love to learn, which makes practicing civil litigation a natural fit. Every new project and each new person brings both the challenge and the opportunity to learn. I enjoy taking a unique set of circumstances and applying my experience and the law to achieve our goal. As a bonus, I learn something new each time.

What class do you wish you could have skipped in law school?

I attended law school in Chicago. The class that required me to wait for the el for what seemed like an eternity in the frigid, whipping winds in the winter months at 6:00 a.m. … yes, that class, I would’ve been glad to skip!

What is the most important lesson you learned from your mentor?

It isn’t a “client,” or a “case,” or a “matter.” They’re people. If you care, listen well, take their problems on as your own and do good work, you’ll never have to worry about having “clients.” Instead, you’ll always be busy and have long-term friends that happen to call you their lawyer.

What civic cause is the most important to you?

I am most passionate about civic causes that focus on youth and the family, such as Youth First Inc., of which I am a board member. The family is the most basic unit of society, which means it is the first defense against most of society’s struggles. Investing in causes that emphasize, promote and strengthen the family and, by extension, the children within that family, leads to stronger communities which, in turn, effect change in society as a whole.

If you couldn’t be a lawyer, what would you do for a living?

A novelist because I love storytelling, or possibly, an event planner because I love to plan and host parties for my friends and children.

What’s your guilty pleasure?

I don’t know if it would be considered a “guilty pleasure,” but I don’t think anything makes me happier than reading stories to my daughters. I also love going to antique stores, flea markets, rummage sales and consignment shops to find discarded old things I can change into something else. I call it “treasure hunting.”

Why do you think people often have negative stereotypes about lawyers?

According to my experience, the overwhelming majority of attorneys are admirable, ethical and professional. They’re leaders in their community and do impressive work inside and outside of the office. However, there is a slim minority of attorneys who, in their quest to win and to be the best, have gone too far. I believe that the poor decision making of these few has led to negative stereotypes about the profession as a whole.

If you could meet and spend the day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?

Abe Lincoln, because I find his writing and reasoning to be so simple yet brilliant. I have three of his quotes posted in my office, including my favorite: “Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other one thing.”

Who is your favorite fictional lawyer?

Jack Brigance in “A Time to Kill” because of the compelling closing argument he delivered to the jury. I haven’t had a chance to read “Sycamore Row,” the sequel.


 

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  1. @ President Snow, like they really read these comments or have the GUTS to show what is the right thing to do. They are just worrying about planning the next retirement party, the others JUST DO NOT CARE about what is right. Its the Good Ol'Boys - they do not care about the rights of the mother or child, they just care about their next vote, which, from what I gather, the mother left the state of Indiana because of the domestic violence that was going on through out the marriage, the father had three restraining orders on him from three different women, but yet, the COA judges sent a strong message, go ahead men put your women in place, do what you have to do, you have our backs... I just wish the REAL truth could be told about this situation... Please pray for this child and mother that God will some how make things right and send a miracle from above.

  2. I hear you.... Us Christians are the minority. The LGBTs groups have more rights than the Christians..... How come when we express our faith openly in public we are prosecuted? This justice system do not want to seem "bias" but yet forgets who have voted them into office.

  3. Perhaps the lady chief justice, or lady appellate court chief judge, or one of the many female federal court judges in Ind could lead this discussion of gender disparity? THINK WITH ME .... any real examples of race or gender bias reported on this ezine? But think about ADA cases ... hmmmm ... could it be that the ISC actually needs to tighten its ADA function instead? Let's ask me or Attorney Straw. And how about religion? Remember it, it used to be right up there with race, and actually more protected than gender. Used to be. Patrick J Buchanan observes: " After World War II, our judicial dictatorship began a purge of public manifestations of the “Christian nation” Harry Truman said we were. In 2009, Barack Obama retorted, “We do not consider ourselves to be a Christian nation.” Secularism had been enthroned as our established religion, with only the most feeble of protests." http://www.wnd.com/2017/02/is-secession-a-solution-to-cultural-war/#q3yVdhxDVMMxiCmy.99 I could link to any of my supreme court filings here, but have done that more than enough. My case is an exclamation mark on what PJB writes. BUT not in ISC, where the progressives obsess on race and gender .... despite a lack of predicate acts in the past decade. Interested in reading more on this subject? Search for "Florida" on this ezine.

  4. Great questions to six jurists. The legislature should open a probe to investigate possible government corruption. Cj rush has shown courage as has justice Steven David. Who stands with them?

  5. The is an unsigned editorial masquerading as a news story. Almost everyone quoted was biased in favor of letting all illegal immigrants remain in the U.S. (Ignoring that Obama deported 3.5 million in 8 years). For some reason Obama enforcing part of the immigration laws was O.K. but Trump enforcing additional parts is terrible. I have listed to press conferences and explanations of the Homeland Security memos and I gather from them that less than 1 million will be targeted for deportation, the "dreamers" will be left alone and illegals arriving in the last two years -- especially those arriving very recently -- will be subject to deportation but after the criminals. This will not substantially affect the GDP negatively, especially as it will take place over a number of years. I personally think this is a rational approach to the illegal immigration problem. It may cause Congress to finally pass new immigration laws rationalizing the whole immigration situation.

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