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Leadership in Law 2014: Jessica Benson Cox

Associate, Faegre Baker Daniels LLP, Indianapolis • Case Western Reserve University School of Law, 2006

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15col-BensonCox.jpg Jessica Benson Cox (IL Photo/ Eric Learned)

Jessica Benson Cox is building a thriving litigation practice defending pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers and other industry leaders, and has become a go-to attorney on matters involving medical and science issues. Jessica’s commitment to civic leadership has earned her a reputation as a community leader. Jessica is described as having “boundless energy,” an asset – to be sure – in balancing the demands of a thriving career, volunteer work and a young family.

Both your parents are doctors. Did you ever consider a career in medicine?

From a very early age, I was absolutely certain I would follow in my parents’ footsteps and pursue a career in medicine … that was until I had my blood drawn my sophomore year of college and fainted.

Why practice in the area of law that you do?

Although I faint at the actual sight of blood, I absolutely love science and medicine on paper. While working on mass torts for pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers, I have developed a niche for working with experts and concentrating on building the “science” defense. I see myself as the translator who helps to explain the science and medicine to my fellow lawyers, and to the jury. If I can learn it, then I can translate it.

What civic cause is the most important to you?

I am fortunate to work with clients who make drugs and devices with the power to save lives and change lives, and I feel compelled to do my part to support nonprofits that work to find solutions for people in need of these miracle drugs and devices. Through my work on the board for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, I have seen how a small group of parents with children with diabetes (which was at one time a death sentence) can start an organization to support research that is well on its way to turning “type-1 into type none.” These organizations also give me hope that with science, anything is possible, and that one day I might be able to do what those JDRF parents did before me – help find a cure for Prader-Willi Syndrome, the rare genetic disorder that affects my own son.

Who is your favorite fictional lawyer?

Olivia Pope. She is creative, passionate and delivers incredible results to her clients. (And her wardrobe isn’t half bad either!)

What’s something about you not many people know?

I am a world and national champion equestrian.

What is the most important lesson you learned from your mentor?

My father always told me life is better when you make your avocation your vocation. I feel truly blessed to have the career that I have, and am often amazed that I get paid to do what I love.

You became a mom in 2013. What’s one tip you would give to other first-time parents?

Accept help when it’s offered. Easy to say, harder to do, and definitely necessary to keep yourself sane.


What was the worst or most memorable job you had prior to becoming an attorney?

I taught horseback riding in high school, but was pretty low on the totem pole at the barn. Most of my students were the people that no one else wanted to teach (i.e. terrified of horses in general and even more terrified to actually ride them).  

What class do you wish you could have skipped in law school?

I think in law school, the professor really could make or break the class. There were certainly classes that I took solely because of the professor (rather than subject area), and classes that I avoided for this reason, too.

What’s your guilty pleasure?

Online shopping.
 

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  1. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  2. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  3. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

  4. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  5. This article proved very enlightening. Right ahead of sitting the LSAT for the first time, I felt a sense of relief that a score of 141 was admitted to an Indiana Law School and did well under unique circumstances. While my GPA is currently 3.91 I fear standardized testing and hope that I too will get a good enough grade for acceptance here at home. Thanks so much for this informative post.

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