Lecture kicks off counter-terrorism simulation

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The first lecture of Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis' Distinguished Speaker Series will feature an armed conflict and counter-terrorism specialist and international law consultant. Lt. Col. David Benjamin, recently retired from the Israel Defense Forces after 17 years, will speak about Israel's fight against terrorism in the event, "The Charge of the Lawyers' Brigade" on Oct. 22.

Before his retirement in February, Benjamin served as director of the Strategic and International Affairs Branch in the IDF International Law Department, where he headed a team of military lawyers dealing with foreign relations, economic and humanitarian affairs, and international military cooperation. Benjamin worked as chief legal advisor for the Gaza Strip from 2001 to 2005; he also briefly served as a military court judge, and spent some time working in civil litigation in a Tel Aviv law firm.

Benjamin has dealt with many of the cutting-edge issues of international law being faced by democratic states fighting non-state terrorist actors and has expertise in numerous areas of law, including counter-terrorism law and the law of belligerent occupation.

He received his master's degree in law from Tel Aviv University and bachelor's degree in political studies and law from the University of Cape Town. He's also a licensed attorney in Israel.

Benjamin's lecture will help set the scene for the counter-terrorism simulation exercise being conducted on Oct. 23. The law school and IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs are co-sponsoring the simulation, which will involve law and public policy students. Participants will work side-by-side with local and state government officials to respond to a simulated national counter-terrorism threat.

The Oct. 22 lecture begins at 5 p.m. in the Wynne Courtroom in the law school, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis. One hour of CLE credit is available. Those interested in attending need to RSVP by calling (317) 278-3400.

More information is available on the law's school's Web site.


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