ILNews

Turnip the root of a law firm scare

Jennifer Nelson
January 1, 2008
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A Fort Wayne law firm got a scare yesterday when it received a suspicious package from a disgruntled man included in a lawsuit filed by one of the firm's clients. The firm believed it could contain a bomb and called 9-1-1. It turns out it was only a turnip.

The firm Haller & Colvin called police around 3:15 p.m. Thursday after employees opened a package in a typical cardboard box addressed to the firm. The package contained a gift bag with tissue wrapping covering the contents, said Fort Wayne Police Department spokesman Michael Joyner, but no note or anything to indicate there was a bomb inside.

The law firm had reason to be suspicious - the sender of the package was an individual whom the firm didn't represent, but is party to a lawsuit to clean up the title to some real estate owned by one of the firm's clients. Mark Giaquinta, partner at Haller & Colvin, said this man has claimed to be financially ruined as a result of the real estate transaction and has demonstrated in the past that he's a volatile individual.

The firm had sent a letter to the man asking his help in removing his name from the real estate title; the man returned a letter with an obscenity written largely across the paper, Giaquinta said. Without his cooperation, the law firm had to include the man in the lawsuit. After doing so, the firm received the suspicious package.

Based on the law firm's concerns, the police followed protocol and called in the city's bomb unit and evacuated the building. The bomb unit used a robot to pick up the package and move it to the parking lot to take X-rays.

"Based upon the X-rays we took, the technicians felt comfortable saying there was no bomb inside that could do damage," Joyner said, adding the police decided to destroy the package because of the firm's concerns.

The robotic device was able to introduce a high-pressure stream of water onto the package, open it up, and show the contents inside. A technician found a turnip in a sandwich bag inside the gift bag.

Joyner said the police rendered the area safe at about 6 p.m.
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  1. Hail to our Constitutional Law Expert in the Executive Office! “What you’re not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law,” Obama said.

  2. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  3. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  4. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  5. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

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