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Longtime northern Indiana attorney dies

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Nick J. Thiros, who practiced law in northwest Indiana for more than 50 years, died Oct. 14.

Thiros, 78, grew up in Gary, where he began his legal career in 1957 after graduating from Valparaiso University School of Law. He and Max Cohen formed the law firm Cohen & Thiros in 1971, where he practiced in criminal law. Two of Thiros’ children, Mark and Jim, joined the firm in the late 1980s. The two sons recently formed a partnership with Paul Stracci, and the firm is now named Thiros & Stracci. Thiros continued to work there as a senior partner until his death.

He belonged to many legal organizations, including the National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys and was a Fellow of the American Board of Criminal Lawyers. Thiros helped create and implement the public defender systems for Lake Superior Court and the District Court in Hammond. His cross examinations were described as “legendarily feared” and he was highly respected by fellow attorneys and judges.

Thiros is survived by his wife, Helen; children Louis (Mary), Connie, Jim (Anne), and Mark (Yvette); two brothers-in-law; many nieces and nephews; and five grandchildren. Visitation is today from 2 to 8 p.m. at Kish Funeral Home, 10000 Calumet Ave., Munster, with a Trisagian Prayer Service at 5 p.m. Funeral service is 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 8000 Madison Ave., Merrillville. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the church or Cerebral Palsy of NW Indiana Inc.

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  1. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  2. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  3. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  4. Different rules for different folks....

  5. I would strongly suggest anyone seeking mediation check the experience of the mediator. There are retired judges who decide to become mediators. Their training and experience is in making rulings which is not the point of mediation.

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