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Lucas: Judges say all young lawyers face challenges

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EidtPerspLucas-sigMy seat at the recent Indiana Supreme Court Bar Admission Ceremony provided a perfect vantage point to witness the mix of emotions young lawyers feel when they have the opportunity to present themselves for the first time to members of the state’s highest-ranking courts.

Some clearly had found their voices, and they announced their names “loud and proud” to the judges looking on; others were clearly on a mission to get through it and find their seats as quickly as possible. But almost every one of these young attorneys, who on this day would be taking their oath to practice in Indiana’s state and federal courts, visibly exhaled – letting out a huge sigh of relief – as they turned from the distinguished panel they faced and headed toward their seats.

Most of us can relate to the mix of pride, excitement and anxiety that lawyers who graduated and passed the bar exam in the spring of 2012 felt on this day. We’ve all experienced moments of transition in our careers when we left behind a safe place, stepping out of our comfort zone for new challenges. This is, after all, what these men and women have been working toward for the past three or four years.

But today’s law grads face a struggling economy and an uncertain job market. Reports tell us that hiring is down and fewer lawyers are leaving law school with job prospects than in days past. So how does a group anxious to begin their new careers balance the enthusiasm they feel to get started with the reality that finding the right opportunity may take time?

Retiring Court of Appeals Judge Carr Darden reminded those present that all generations of new lawyers face challenges. When he had his “coming out party as a lawyer,” he explained, it was civil rights. Southern District of Indiana Judge Sarah Evans Barker invited anyone in the group who feels he or she has it harder than those who’ve come before to talk with women of her generation.

“The practice of law is like a marathon,” Darden said. “The ultimate winner is not necessarily the one who gets off to the fastest start, but the one who is prepared to do it the right way.”

Barker echoed her colleague’s sentiment. “If you add a little to a little, and do this often, soon the little will become great.” That is how you build a law career, she said.

Several proverbs were cited by Darden to support the message the judges were sending.

“Work on your reputation until it is established, and when it is established, it will work for you,” he advised his audience of newly minted lawyers. He also cautioned, “work is good, provided you do not forget to live.”

Prior to making the formal motion for admission, Attorney General Greg Zoeller told the young lawyers that being a member of this profession will require them to do two things: serve the interest of clients first; and do so with passion and zeal. He pointed out that the final line of the oath they were about to take – “so help me God” – is a prayer, and he encouraged them never to be afraid to ask for that help.

A number of the judges and officials speaking at the ceremony drove home the point that what each of the young lawyers has obtained can never be taken away from them, except by their own misconduct or misdeeds. The advice is not new but it bears repeating: be fair, courteous and civil at all times.

Quoting radio personality Garrison Keillor, Barker reminded the group to “stay in touch.”

“That is what people want from their lawyers,” she said. She cautioned the new lawyers – many from a generation that relies on technology to communicate – not to get caught up in the conveniences of recorded messages and emails. Her final words on the topic: “You need real relationships with people. Make connections.”

A complete list of those who passed the February 2012 bar exam is on page 12. The Indiana Lawyer congratulates Indiana’s newest class of lawyers and wishes each a successful and fulfilling career.•

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  1. Ah yes... Echoes of 1963 as a ghostly George Wallace makes his stand at the Schoolhouse door. We now know about the stand of personal belief over service to all constituents at the Carter County Clerk door. The results are the same, bigotry unable to follow the directions of the courts and the courts win. Interesting to watch the personal belief take a back seat rather than resign from a perception of local power to make the statement.

  2. An oath of office, does it override the conscience? That is the defense of overall soldier who violates higher laws, isnt it? "I was just following orders" and "I swore an oath of loyalty to der Fuhrer" etc. So this is an interesting case of swearing a false oath and then knowing that it was wrong and doing the right thing. Maybe they should chop her head off too like the "king's good servant-- but God's first" like St Thomas More. ...... We wont hold our breath waiting for the aclu or other "civil liberterians" to come to her defense since they are all arrayed on the gay side, to a man or should I say to a man and womyn?

  3. Perhaps we should also convene a panel of independent anthropological experts to study the issues surrounding this little-known branch of human sacrifice?

  4. I'm going to court the beginning of Oct. 2015 to establish visitation and request my daughters visits while she is in jail. I raised my grandchild for the first two and half years. She was born out of wedlock and the father and his adopted mother wantwd her aborted, they went as far as sueing my daughter for abortion money back 5mo. After my grandchild was born. Now because of depression and drug abuse my daughter lost custody 2 and a half years ago. Everyting went wrong in court when i went for custody my lawyer was thrown out and a replacment could only stay 45 min. The judge would not allow a postponement. So the father won. Now he is aleinating me and my daughter. No matter the amount of time spent getting help for my daughter and her doing better he runs her in the ground to the point of suicide because he wants her to be in a relationship with him. It is a sick game of using my grandchild as a pawn to make my daughter suffer for not wanting to be with him. I became the intervener in the case when my daughter first got into trouble. Because of this they gave me her visitation. Im hoping to get it again there is questions of abuse on his part and I want to make sure my grandchild is doing alright. I really dont understand how the parents have rights to walk in and do whatever they want when the refuse to stand up and raise the child at first . Why should it take two and a half years to decide you want to raise your child.The father used me so he could finish college get a job and stop paying support by getting custody. Support he was paying my daughter that I never saw.

  5. Pence said when he ordered the investigation that Indiana residents should be troubled by the allegations after the video went viral. Planned Parenthood has asked the government s top health scientists at the National Institutes of Health to convene a panel of independent experts to study the issues surrounding the little-known branch of medicine.

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