ILNews

Lucas: Another year older and, hopefully, wiser

Kelly Lucas
March 13, 2013
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EidtPerspLucas-sigAs they say, time flies when you are having fun. I’ve found that it also seems to stampede past when you are very busy. Both have been the case for the staff of the Indiana Lawyer. But time moves on, which is a good thing, and with this issue of the paper Indiana Lawyer turns another year older.

It is done without fanfare – the only telltale sign is that the paper’s Page 1 “odometer” rolls over to a new volume number. With this issue of the paper we begin our 24th year.

An anniversary is a time to reflect, and I am happy to say that it has been a good year for the Indiana Lawyer. Sure, we face many of the challenges universally experienced by print media, but our loyal readers have kept us strong while our digital presence has continued to grow. I thank you for that.

The newspaper welcomed two “new to us” but otherwise very experienced reporters to our staff in 2012. Dave Stafford and Marilyn Odendahl each came to IBJ Media from daily newspapers where they have spent the majority of their careers, and both have hit the ground running covering Indiana’s legal community. The resourcefulness and creativity that they, along with managing editor Jennifer Nelson, show with each new issue and in our IL daily email continues to enable us to bring you both in-depth print reporting and breaking news. Inspiration can certainly be found in working with good people.

Indiana Lawyer hosted six successful CLE programs in 2012, and a debt of gratitude is owed to the lawyers who lent their professional expertise in the areas of ethics, immigration, sports law, employment, intellectual property and federal civil practice to make that happen. I hope that those of you who have attended one or two of these programs in the past have found the content valuable. For me, the opportunity to meet lawyers who I might not otherwise have an occasion to spend time with is priceless.

In early 2013, the newspaper launched a second news email – Lawyers on the Move. This email brings readers the names and faces of peers who are making a move, serving in a new professional or volunteer capacity or are receiving a well-deserved recognition. It is a quick read delivered to your desktop, phone or tablet and designed to keep you in-the-know. Check it out or, better yet, sign up for this free email at www.theIndianaLawyer.com.

Volume 23 of the Indiana Lawyer represented my first full year as editor and publisher of this newspaper. While covering a state the size of Indiana with a small but mighty staff is not without its challenges, we can do it because of the many lawyers who are willing to share their valuable time and insights with us. We’ve revived our Spotlight sections this year to bring greater emphasis to people and legal happenings in all regions of Indiana, and the support of the bar association directors around the state has been invaluable in that process.

Indiana Lawyer’s relationship with the Indianapolis Bar Association and the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana, whose newsletters appear regularly in this publication; the columnists and contributors who so willingly share their interests and legal expertise; the advertisers who see IL as a valuable vehicle to reach legal practitioners; and last, but certainly not least, our readers, who we wouldn’t exist without, continues to strengthen. As I’ve said before, let us know how you think we are doing. Submit your news, On the Move announcements, and letters to the editor. It’s why we’re here.•
 

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  1. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  2. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  3. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  4. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

  5. Can I get this form on line,if not where can I obtain one. I am eligible.

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