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Lucas: More information is needed when judging the judges

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EidtPerspLucas-sigMy mailbox has been overflowing lately with political flyers. I can’t turn on the television without seeing a steady barrage of Pence vs. Gregg, Mourdock vs. Donnelly or, of course, Obama vs. Romney ads. I’m sure you can relate.

But up the street and around the corner from my Broad Ripple house, a yard sign caught my eye that didn’t involve the usual Democrat versus Republican political rhetoric. This simple, hand-painted sign called for the ouster of Supreme Court Justice Steven David.

I find this rather disjointed grassroots effort to remove a sitting Supreme Court justice from the bench both fascinating and disturbing.

On the one hand, it demonstrates the people exercising their right of free speech, and based on what I know of Justice David, no one would support that more than him. In this issue of Indiana Lawyer, the justice speaks about those who oppose him, saying: “If somebody feels strongly that they don’t like the decision, I would defend until my death their right to have that opinion. As painful as that may be personally, that is who we are” as a country.

As I’m sure most know by now, the decision Justice David refers to is Richard L. Barnes v. State of Indiana, issued by the Supreme Court in 2011. In the case stemming from police response to a domestic violence 911 call, Justice David wrote the majority opinion which held that “there is no right to reasonably resist unlawful entry by police officers.” While protests over the decision from those who felt it contradicted the Fourth Amendment and calls to remove the justice seemed to die down late last year, new life seems to have been breathed into the effort during this campaign season even though statutory changes made by the 2012 Legislature made the decision moot.

Still, public conversation is vital, and regardless of your stance on the issue brought to light through Barnes, it is good to see that the process can work. Judges rule based on their interpretation of the laws and Constitution; citizens voice their concerns if they do not feel those decisions, based on our rule of law, reflect society; and government reacts to effect change, if deemed appropriate. Opinions may not be unanimous, they may not always be correct, but the majority rules.

But on the other hand, the effort raises concerns about the understanding our citizenry has as to the role of a judge. I am certainly not the first to question this. Surveys tend to reveal that society at large knows little about the judiciary. Many people can not name members of their state’s supreme court. They tend to do a bit better with naming U.S. Supreme Court justices, but not significantly better.

Knowing this, it is not surprising that there is a lack of understanding in our society about how judges and justices arrive at the decisions they issue. Of course, I have no way of knowing if those behind this particular retention campaign effort understand that judges must rule using the laws and Constitution. Some have said they feel a line was crossed in this decision, but do they believe that line was crossed due to the interjection of personal or political opinion in the case or because the justices writing for the majority interpreted the law and Constitution differently than their detractors do?

Court-watchers say Justice David’s decisions have been fairly mainstream or middle of the road. Indiana attorneys gave him a favorability rating of 81 percent in the Indiana State Bar Association judicial survey. When Gov. Mitch Daniels chose Justice David to fill a seat on the Supreme Court, he said from him he heard, “the clearest expression of commitment to proper restraint in jurisprudence and deep respect for the boundaries of judicial decision making.” Gov. Daniels said, “He will be a judge who interprets rather than invents our laws.”

I understand that I am “preaching to the choir” when it comes to understanding the role of the judiciary. Regardless of your opinion of this particular judge’s work, or any judge’s work for that matter, it seems supporting the ouster of a judge based on one decision is dangerous. It seems to fly in the face of maintaining an independent judiciary. So is this, as they say, a teaching moment? Is it time for the choir to start singing?

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  • How condescending!
    Is it wrong for an ordinary citizen to disagree, not so much with a judge's decision but with a very poorly written ruling? Am I not 'educated' enough to have a voice? What if I simply feel that this Justice did a terrible job, most specifically on how he wrote the ruling, on a extremely important case? I thought he muddied the water and went beyond what the attorneys and the case regarded. If I majorly screw up an important project at my job I would face reprisal or possibly termination especially if it jeopardizes my employer. They would at least expect me to accept responsibility. I simply came to this site in research about how to make my retention vote and wanted to review these events objectively. (yes, I might be a rare breed that reviews the entire ballot before I go to vote.) However, I am amazed at arrogance expressed in this article. I don't believe you are an arrogant person. I tend to give most people the benefit of the doubt and I don't know you personally. So I want to ask, do judges and attorneys view citizens this way, an angry mob of mindless zombies that need to be schooled in the high and mighty ways of judicial workings? Or is the Judiciary too much for the meager concerned citizen to comprehend? No need to respond... I am just an ordinary citizen with no judicial qualifications.

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  1. I am compelled to announce that I am not posting under any Smith monikers here. That said, the post below does have a certain ring to it that sounds familiar to me: http://www.catholicnewworld.com/cnwonline/2014/0907/cardinal.aspx

  2. As an adoptive parent, I have to say this situation was as shameful as it gets. While the state government opens its wallet to the Simons and their friends, it denied payments to the most vulnerable in our state. Thanks Mitch!

  3. We as lawyers who have given up the range of First amendment freedom that other people possess, so that we can have a license to practice in the courts of the state and make gobs of money, that we agree to combat the hateful and bigoted discrimination enshrined in the law by democratic majorities, that Law Lord Posner has graciously explained for us....... We must now unhesitatingly condemn the sincerely held religious beliefs of religiously observant Catholics, Muslims, Christians, and Jewish persons alike who yet adhere to Scriptural exhortations concerning sodomites and catamites..... No tolerance will be extended to intolerance, and we must hate the haters most zealously! And in our public explanations of this constitutional garbledygook, when doing the balancing act, we must remember that the state always pushes its finger down on the individualism side of the scale at every turn and at every juncture no matter what the cost to society.....to elevate the values of a minority over the values of the majority is now the defining feature of American "Democracy..." we must remember our role in tricking Americans to think that this is desirable in spite of their own democratically expressed values being trashed. As a secular republic the United States might as well be officially atheist, religious people are now all bigots and will soon be treated with the same contempt that kluckers were in recent times..... The most important thing is that any source of moral authority besides the state be absolutely crushed.

  4. In my recent article in Indiana Lawyer, I noted that grass roots marketing -- reaching out and touching people -- is still one of the best forms of advertising today. It's often forgotten in the midst of all of today's "newer wave" marketing techniques. Shaking hands and kissing babies is what politicians have done for year and it still works. These are perfect examples of building goodwill. Kudos to these firms. Make "grass roots" an essential part of your marketing plan. Jon Quick QPRmarketing.com

  5. Hi, Who can I speak to regarding advertising today? Thanks, Gary

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