ILNews

Lucas: Nominations for 2013 Leadership in Law awards being accepted

Kelly Lucas
October 10, 2012
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EidtPerspLucas-sigWe’ve all experienced that feeling of awe as we watch another lawyer make his case in a courtroom or meeting. There is a moment when you realize “this guy is really good,” and your brain begins to analyze what he is doing to make his argument so effective and how you can put some of those strategies to work in your legal career. Whether it is the attention to detail that grabs you or the passion conveyed when making the case, some lawyers clearly lead by example.

Each year, the Indiana Lawyer recognizes and honors members of the legal profession who have demonstrated leadership in the practice of law. Because success is achieved in stages, Leadership in Law awards are categorized by years of practice.

The Up-and-Coming Lawyer award takes notice of young attorneys who have been practicing seven years or less. While their careers are still developing, these are professionals whose work has made their peers, law firm partners or even legal adversaries take notice of their dedication, talent and skills. Successful nominations in past years have showcased work ethic, involvement in professional organizations, unique approaches to problem-solving or community involvement.

The Distinguished Barrister award honors lawyers who have practiced law 15 years or more. As the name implies, these are lawyers whose work the community respects and who young lawyers aspire to emulate. As with the up-and-coming category, the reason for nominating a person can vary – the person is a skilled legal strategist, she is a dedicated mentor to young lawyers, he is a leader in civic or bar association efforts, or the attorney’s storied career in government or social service shows society the best of what the profession offers.

I encourage you to nominate an up-and-coming lawyer or distinguished barrister who you admire. Time is limited, and I realize that when it comes to discretionary projects like completing a nomination form, while our intentions are good, our follow-through can fall short. But there is something about the feeling derived from taking the time – or making the time – to do something like this that is so satisfying. It has been my experience with the Leadership in Law awards that the nomination process is sometimes as rewarding to the person submitting the nomination as receiving the award is to the honoree.

More information about the Leadership in Law nomination process can be found at www.theindianalawyer.com/submit-leadership-in-law. You will be asked to complete a nomination form that includes providing a narrative explaining why you believe this lawyer deserves to be recognized. We hope that the online format will make this process efficient and effective. A form can be printed from the IL website and nominations mailed or delivered to the IL offices as well. The nominee’s résumé and letters from others in the legal community supporting your nomination are welcomed. This, as well as any other anecdotal information you wish to share, assists the awards committee in its decision making.

The deadline for submitting Leadership in Law nominations is Jan. 15, 2013. If you have questions or would like additional information, please contact me at 317-472-5233 or klucas@ibj.com. The Indiana Lawyer looks forward to honoring another group of up-and-coming lawyers and distinguished barristers in 2013!•
 

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  1. Based on several recent Indy Star articles, I would agree that being a case worker would be really hard. You would see the worst of humanity on a daily basis; and when things go wrong guess who gets blamed??!! Not biological parent!! Best of luck to those who entered that line of work.

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  3. Don't believe me, listen to Pacino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6bC9w9cH-M

  4. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

  5. Attorney? Really? Or is it former attorney? Status with the Ind St Ct? Status with federal court, with SCOTUS? This is a legal newspaper, or should I look elsewhere?

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