ILNews

Lucas: Send us your 2014 Leadership in Law award nominations

Kelly Lucas
July 31, 2013
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

EidtPerspLucas-sigRegardless of our career paths, we’ve all experienced a moment when we’ve watched a peer in action – doing his or her job and doing it very well – and the realization came that this person truly is a role model for our respective professions. Whether the admiration you feel is the result of a big win in court and is splashed across newspapers and TV screens, or the quiet day-to-day way the person works with clients and mentors young lawyers, the Indiana Lawyer would like to recognize the work ethic and dedication that makes certain lawyers stand out.

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2014 Leadership in Law awards. Each year, IL recognizes and honors members of the legal profession who have demonstrated commitment and skill in the practice of law.

Because success is achieved in stages, our Distinguished Barrister and Up and Coming Lawyer awards are categorized by years of practice. This year, we’ve altered the categories slightly. After talking with Indiana attorneys and bar association leaders, IL determined that the revised “years of service” criteria more accurately reflect the awards and the way today’s lawyers work.

The 2014 Up and Coming Lawyer Award takes notice of young attorneys who have been practicing 10 years or less. While their careers are still developing, these are professionals whose work has made their peers, law firm partners or even legal adversaries take notice of their dedication, talent and skills. Successful nominations in past years have showcased work ethic, involvement in professional organizations, unique approaches to problem-solving, or community involvement.

The 2014 Distinguished Barrister Award honors lawyers who have practiced law 20 years or more. As the name implies, these are lawyers whose work the community respects and who young lawyers aspire to emulate. Again, the reason for nominating a person can vary – the person is a skilled legal strategist, she is a dedicated mentor to young lawyers, he is a leader in civic or bar association efforts, or the attorney’s storied career in government or social service shows society the best of what the profession offers.

I encourage you to nominate an up-and-coming lawyer or distinguished barrister who you believe is deserving of this recognition. More information about the Leadership in Law nomination criteria and submission process, online and print forms, and a list of past winners can be found at www.theindianalawyer.com/nominations.

You will be asked to complete a nomination form that includes providing a narrative explaining why you believe this lawyer deserves to be recognized. The nominee’s résumé and letters from others in the legal community supporting your nomination are welcomed. This, as well as any other anecdotal information you wish to share, assists the awards committee in its decision making.

The deadline for submitting nominations for our next group of Leadership in Law honorees is Jan. 22, 2014. If you have questions or would like additional information, please contact me at 317-472-5233 or klucas@ibj.com. The Indiana Lawyer looks forward to honoring another group of up-and-coming lawyers and distinguished barristers in 2014!•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
2015 Distinguished Barrister &
Up and Coming Lawyer Reception

Tuesday, May 5, 2015 • 4:30 - 7:00 pm
Learn More


ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  2. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  3. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  4. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

  5. Oh yes, lifetime tenure. The Founders gave that to the federal judges .... at that time no federal district courts existed .... so we are talking the Supreme Court justices only in context ....so that they could rule against traditional marriage and for the other pet projects of the sixties generation. Right. Hmmmm, but I must admit, there is something from that time frame that seems to recommend itself in this context ..... on yes, from a document the Founders penned in 1776: " He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good."

ADVERTISEMENT