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Magistrate, attorney general bills become law

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Magistrates can now be certified as senior judges, and the parents who don't pay ordered child support but gamble at casinos can have their winnings withheld. Those are just two of the many bills Gov. Mitch Daniels has signed into law.

The Indiana General Assembly ended its 2010 session March 13, with the fate of the surviving bills in the hands of the governor. As of Indiana Lawyer deadline, Gov. Daniels had 98 bills before him and signed into law March 12 many of interest to the legal community including:

- Senate Enrolled Act 36 allowing magistrates who meet certain criteria to be certified as senior judges;

- SEA 65 on guardianships, estate administration, trust matters, and wills;

- SEA 394 that allows the attorney general to intervene in a declaratory judgment action which alleges a statute or ordinance to be unconstitutional, and to file a friend-of-the court brief without leave of the court; and

- House Enrolled Act 1350, which enacts the Uniform Interstate Depositions and Discovery Act.

On March 17, the governor signed SEA 163, a child support bill that includes a provision garnishing casino winnings of parents who owe child support.

Also signed Wednesday were HEA 1044 regarding clerk liability; HEA 1062 enacting the Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act; HEA 1154 about Marion County courts; and HEA 1193, which creates the law enforcement, school policing and youth work group.

The governor signed SEA 307 regarding Floyd County courts and HEA 1234 addressing criminal procedures and controlled substances Thursday. Many bills have yet to reach the governor's desk for signature, including HEA 1271 on problem-solving courts and SEA 224, which details how registered sex and violent offenders can have their names removed from the registry if they meet certain requirements.

One piece of legislation the governor won't see is Senate Bill 149, which dealt with Department of Child Services matters. The bill died in conference committee because the language would have reverted back to allowing the courts to decide whether to send juveniles to out-of-state placements. Last-minute revisions at the end of the 2009 special session allowed for DCS to make that decision. Rep. Dennis Avery, D-Evansville, said he heard Senate leadership was supporting the administration and felt the placement revision was an attempt to embarrass the DCS and Director James Payne.

Many enrolled acts have yet to reach the governor's desk for signature or have signing deadlines past IL deadline. The governor has seven days to sign legislation once he receives it. If he chooses not to sign it, it becomes law on the eighth day unless he vetoes it. Visit the governor's Web site to the check the status of bills awaiting his signature.

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  2. Hail to our Constitutional Law Expert in the Executive Office! “What you’re not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law,” Obama said.

  3. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  4. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  5. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

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