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IBA: Make Time to Pause for Professionalism

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Civility and professionalism — and often the lack of it — have become increasingly discussed subjects in judicial opinions and between lawyers. To recognize and advance the importance of civility and professionalism in the legal profession, several years ago the Indianapolis Bar Association founded a Professionalism Committee. This Committee has undertaken several projects, most of which are driven by the “Standards of Professionalism” adopted by the Committee. Those standards can be found at www.indybar.org/resources/professionalism.

We are all aware of the Rules of Professional Conduct, the Indiana Rules For Admission To The Bar And The Discipline Of Attorneys, the Rules For Alternative Dispute Resolution, and the Code of Judicial Conduct. Those rules spell out the formal parameters that govern our conduct as lawyers and judges. A new program from the Indianapolis Bar Association seeks to quickly and easily add some practical insight about how those rules apply in daily practice.

Over the last year, the Professionalism Committee and numerous preeminent members of the Indianapolis Bar Association and the Judiciary have worked on a new initiative entitled, “Pause for Professionalism.” The purpose of this program is to provide members of the Bar Association with quick (no more than 5 minutes) and easy to access (just “click”) videos that are delivered to your in-box. The presenters are highly respected judges and lawyers who give a succinct presentation on the practical application of topics dealing with civility, professionalism, and/or ethics. You can look forward to seeing videos from Judge Tanya Walton Pratt, Magistrate Judge Tim A. Baker, Chief Judge Margret Robb, Judge Gerald Zore, Melissa Avery, Bob Hammerle, Wayne Turner, Melissa Proffitt Reese, and John Van Winkle. The subjects include civility in family law, discovery, criminal law, appeals, mediation, business transactions, and more.

Beginning in March, please keep your eye open for the “Pause for Professionalism” link within the IndyBar weekly e-bulletins. The Professionalism Committee encourages you to click on these videos and take no more than five minutes of your time to “Pause for Professionalism.” New videos will be distributed every other month; following their debut each will be available for viewing anytime on the IndyBar website at http://www.indybar.org/resources/video-gallery.php.•
 

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  1. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  2. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  3. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  4. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  5. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

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