ILNews

Moving a law library, maintaining accessibility

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share


What could have been a tragic end to a law library in central Indiana at the end of 2009 will be a new beginning in 2010.

The Marion County Law Library, which had been located in the City-County Building, closed its doors due to budget cuts Dec. 31. But in early 2010, some of the materials from that law library will be moved to the Central Branch of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library just a few blocks away in downtown Indianapolis, 40 E. St. Clair St., the court announced.

The IMCPL will be more convenient to most users, said Marion Superior Judge Heather Welch, who has been a key player in the decision to partner with IMCPL. Judge Welch has served as the supervising judge for the county's law library and currently serves as the civil term chairperson.

Library patrons will not be restricted to the operational hours of the City-County Building, which is closed on weekends, and will have easier access to parking in the library's underground garage, she added.

The central library's regular hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. The courthouse law library hours were 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Judge Welch said it was through a friend of hers on the library foundation board for IMCPL that she was able to get in touch with chief executive officer Laura Bramble and discuss possibilities for the law library. That happened in October 2009 when she first learned the court's budget wouldn't cover the library.

The partnership will include access to the law library's materials at the central branch, as well as training for librarians to have an increased awareness of the Indiana Supreme Court's Web site for pro se litigants, which will be accessible via computers at the various library branch locations.

When it comes to updating materials, which will be costly depending on what will be updated, Bramble said the library will work with the court in the future to determine the best way to do this. She said the library might ask members of the library foundation for their support, as well.

Those who reference the materials at the public library will also have access to brochures, free Internet access via a computer and wireless Internet connection, printer and copier services, and a copy of a DVD specifically for pro se litigants.

Bramble also planned to work with Judge Welch on access to courthouse staff, knowing that the law library's librarian would be able to call others in the courthouse for help with forms if there were any questions that came up on a regular basis.

Part of the training for IMCPL librarians will include knowing the difference between helping someone and unauthorized practice of law, Judge Welch and Bramble both said.

"We're not lawyers, so we can't help them fill out their forms," Bramble said, "but we can help them find the forms online."

She added that librarians at the branch libraries will also need a basic understanding of how the Supreme Court's pro se Web site works, but added many of the librarians already know due to past requests for help from patrons.

For those who go to the City-County Building looking for legal materials or are already there for a case, Judge Welch said there will be a pro se center with pamphlets and other materials for pro se litigants.

She said the typical pro se litigant who used the law library had a family law issue such as divorce, paternity, custody, or child support, and that information will still be accessible at the City-County Building but more materials will be available at the public library.

There are also other law libraries in the area, including Ruth Lilly Law Library at Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis, which is open to the public but most of its materials must be viewed in the library (http://indylaw.indiana.edu/library/); and the Indiana State Library at 315 W. Ohio St. in Indianapolis also has some reference materials that might be valuable for legal research.

Around the state, other county law libraries continue to operate.

The Vanderburgh County Law Library was recently praised in the Evansville Bar Association's November 2009 newsletter by EBA President Shawn Sullivan.

Sullivan wrote about using the library when he recently needed to look up the 1933 version of a statute to compare it to the current one.

That information wasn't available through his firm's online resources, but he was able to find it at the law library with the help of law librarian Helen Reed, who has been with the library since 1985.

He added that the law library was one of the EBA's original goals when it was established in 1911, and that dues from the EBA's members still support the library by helping to fund the Vanderburgh Law Library Foundation, founded in 1982.

The St. Joseph County Law Library's budget was slashed a few years ago by the county, but the library is still open. St. Joseph County Bar Association executive director Amy McGuire helps run the library, but she is limited to what she can do because of her other duties and because she is only there part-time. The library is open the same hours as the courthouse.

McGuire said she still sees a number of pro se litigants use the library's materials, but that the library also serves as a meeting place for lawyers, and she has seen lawyers and court staff visit the library to look up information during trials.

She added that when the budget was significantly cut a few years ago, the materials could not be updated. But after hearing a number of complaints, she and attorneys on the bar association's board decided to raise the membership dues to cover updates for the most-used materials.

She has referred patrons to Notre Dame Law School's library, which is also open to the public.

While Bramble said she was sad to hear about the law library closing in Marion County, she said the partnership was a natural fit because library patrons were already asking reference librarians for help with legal issues on a daily basis. In fact, reference librarians would frequently refer patrons to the law library at the courthouse.

"It has given a lot of great service to the residents of Marion County, and there is a great need for this service," she said. "We'll get a substantial portion of the collection and it will help our patrons. ... No staff will be devoted only to those materials, but ... in the future, Judge Welch and I will be working together to enhance the library staff's ability to handle questions and to help the citizens who need that sort of help."

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Two cops shot execution style in NYC. Was it first amendment protest, or was it incitement to lawlessness? Some are keeping track of the body bags: http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2014/12/13/al-sharpton-leads-thousands-in-saturday-march-on-washington-dc/

  2. From the MCBA: “This situation is not just about the death of Michael Brown, but the thousands of other African-Americans who are disproportionately targeted and killed by police officers.” The association said it was “saddened and disappointed” by the decision not to indict Ferguson police officer. HOPING that the MCBA will denouce the execution style killig of two NYC police officers this day, seemingly the act of one who likewise believes that the police are targeting blacks for murder and getting away with it. http://www.mediaite.com/online/two-nypd-cops-fatally-shot-in-ambush-in-brooklyn/ Pray this violence soon ends, and pray it stays far away from Indiana.

  3. "Am I bugging you? I don't mean to bug ya." If what I wrote below is too much social philosophy for Indiana attorneys, just take ten this vacay to watch The Lego Movie with kiddies and sing along where appropriate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etzMjoH0rJw

  4. I've got some free speech to share here about who is at work via the cat's paw of the ACLU stamping out Christian observances.... 2 Thessalonians chap 2: "And we also thank God continually because, when you received the word of God, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as a human word, but as it actually is, the word of God, which is indeed at work in you who believe. For you, brothers and sisters, became imitators of God’s churches in Judea, which are in Christ Jesus: You suffered from your own people the same things those churches suffered from the Jews who killed the Lord Jesus and the prophets and also drove us out. They displease God and are hostile to everyone in their effort to keep us from speaking to the Gentiles so that they may be saved. In this way they always heap up their sins to the limit. The wrath of God has come upon them at last."

  5. Did someone not tell people who have access to the Chevy Volts that it has a gas engine and will run just like a normal car? The batteries give the Volt approximately a 40 mile range, but after that the gas engine will propel the vehicle either directly through the transmission like any other car, or gas engine recharges the batteries depending on the conditions.

ADVERTISEMENT