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Nominations sought for awards

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Bar Crawl

Bar Crawl is Indiana Lawyer’s new section that will highlight bar association news around the state. We try to include bar association news and trends in our regular stories, but we want to include more news from specialty and county bars. If you’d like to submit an update about your bar association or a photo from an event your bar association has hosted to Indiana Lawyer, or if you have questions about having your bar association news included in the newspaper, please send it to Rebecca Berfanger, rberfanger@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date. If you know of member of the legal community who demonstrates dedication and professionalism above and beyond most, there are several awards for which they may be considered. Deadlines are quickly approaching.

Nominations are still being accepted for the Excellence in Pro Bono Publico Randall T. Shepard Award, which is given to someone who contributes significant work and dedication to the development and delivery of legal services to Indiana’s poor. More information can be found at www.inbar.org.

Sponsored by the Indiana Pro Bono Commission, complete nomination packages should be submitted by Aug. 9 to Monica Fennell, executive director, Indiana Pro Bono Commission, at 230 E. Ohio St., Suite 400, Indianapolis, IN 46204, or mfennell@inbf.org.

Indiana State Bar Association is accepting nominations for several awards that will be presented at the bar’s annual meeting. Nominations are due Aug. 9. Awards include the Affiliate Member Award for paralegals, legal administrators, law librarians or court administrators; the Gale M. Phelps Award, given in memory of Gale M. Phelps, a former chair of the ISBA Family & Juvenile Law Section and one of the most active members of the section who passed away in 2003; Civility Awards to recognize an attorney and judge for outstanding civility and professionalism in their dealings with fellow judges, attorneys, parties, witnesses, and the public; Rabb Emison Awards, which recognize an individual and an organization that have demonstrated a commitment to promote diversity and equality in the legal profession; and the Hon. Viola Taliaferro Award, which recognizes an individual who best exemplifies Judge Taliaferro’s courageous leadership in addressing the unmet legal needs of children and in raising the public’s awareness of these needs.

There are other awards as well. For more information and nomination forms, contact the ISBA at (317) 639-5465 or (800) 266-2581, or visit the bar’s website, www.inbar.org.

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