ILNews

Nominations sought for numerous awards

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

If you know of a lawyer or judge who demonstrates dedication and professionalism above and beyond most, there are several awards for which they may be considered. Deadlines are quickly approaching.

Nominations are still being accepted for the Excellence in Pro Bono Publico Randall T. Shepard Award, which is given to someone who contributes significant work and dedication to the development and delivery of legal services to Indiana’s poor. More information can be found here. Sponsored by the Indiana Pro Bono Commission, complete nomination packages should be submitted by Aug. 9 to Monica Fennell, executive director, Indiana Pro Bono Commission, at 230 E. Ohio St., Suite 400, Indianapolis, IN 46204 or mfennell@inbf.org.

The Indiana State Bar Association is accepting nominations for several awards that will be presented at the bar’s annual meeting. Nominations are due Aug. 9. Awards include the Affiliate Member Award for paralegals, legal administrators, law librarians or court administrators; the Gale M. Phelps Award, given in memory of Gale M. Phelps, a former chair of the ISBA Family & Juvenile Law Section and one of the most active members of the section, who passed away in 2003; Civility Awards to recognize an attorney and judge for outstanding civility and professionalism in their dealings with fellow judges, attorneys, parties, witnesses, and the public; Rabb Emison Awards, which recognize an individual and an organization that have demonstrated a commitment to promote diversity and equality in the legal profession; and the Hon. Viola Taliaferro Award, which recognizes an individual who best exemplifies Judge Taliaferro’s courageous leadership in addressing the unmet legal needs of children and in raising the public’s awareness of these needs.

There are other awards as well. For more information and nomination forms, contact the ISBA at (317) 639-5465 or (800) 266-2581, or visit the bar’s website.

The Allen County Bar Association is accepting nominations for the Niemann Citation, which honors the memory of Scott T. Niemann and recognizes ACBA members who, like Scott, exemplify professionalism and excellence in the practice of law, as reflected in distinguished legal work, professionalism, public service, and leadership. Nominations are due Aug. 2; the form can be found here.

The Indianapolis Bar Association is accepting nominations until July 31 for the Antoinette Dakin Leach Award, which recognizes the accomplishments of female attorneys in central Indiana. It also is seeking nominations for: the IBA Professionalism Award that recognizes an attorney, and the IBA Silver Gavel Award that honors a judge. The nominations for these are due Aug. 5. Nominations may be submitted to the IBA, 135 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 1500, Indianapolis, IN 46204. For more information, call (317) 269-2000.

In addition, the Indiana Judges Association seeks to recognize those members of the judiciary who have made special contributions to the judicial profession by their efforts in community relations. Nominees should have in the past year conducted programs, projects or sustained efforts that inform and educate the public or otherwise enhance the image of the judiciary. The nomination form for the 2010 Commendation for Excellence In Public Information and Education is here.  

The association also will recognize individual reporters or newspapers, radio or television firms that sustained efforts that inform and educate the public about the judiciary. The nomination form for this award is here.


Nominations for both IJA awards are due Aug. 17 to the Indiana Judicial Center, 30 S. Meridian St., Suite 900, Indianapolis, IN 46204.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Major social engineering imposed by judicial order well in advance of democratic change, has been the story of the whole post ww2 period. Contraception, desegregation, abortion, gay marriage: all rammed down the throats of Americans who didn't vote to change existing laws on any such thing, by the unelected lifetime tenure Supreme court heirarchs. Maybe people came to accept those things once imposed upon them, but, that's accommodation not acceptance; and surely not democracy. So let's quit lying to the kids telling them this is a democracy. Some sort of oligarchy, but no democracy that's for sure, and it never was. A bourgeois republic from day one.

  2. JD Massur, yes, brings to mind a similar stand at a Texas Mission in 1836. Or Vladivostok in 1918. As you seemingly gloat, to the victors go the spoils ... let the looting begin, right?

  3. I always wondered why high fence deer hunting was frowned upon? I guess you need to keep the population steady. If you don't, no one can enjoy hunting! Thanks for the post! Fence

  4. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  5. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

ADVERTISEMENT