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Nominations sought for numerous awards

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If you know of a lawyer or judge who demonstrates dedication and professionalism above and beyond most, there are several awards for which they may be considered. Deadlines are quickly approaching.

Nominations are still being accepted for the Excellence in Pro Bono Publico Randall T. Shepard Award, which is given to someone who contributes significant work and dedication to the development and delivery of legal services to Indiana’s poor. More information can be found here. Sponsored by the Indiana Pro Bono Commission, complete nomination packages should be submitted by Aug. 9 to Monica Fennell, executive director, Indiana Pro Bono Commission, at 230 E. Ohio St., Suite 400, Indianapolis, IN 46204 or mfennell@inbf.org.

The Indiana State Bar Association is accepting nominations for several awards that will be presented at the bar’s annual meeting. Nominations are due Aug. 9. Awards include the Affiliate Member Award for paralegals, legal administrators, law librarians or court administrators; the Gale M. Phelps Award, given in memory of Gale M. Phelps, a former chair of the ISBA Family & Juvenile Law Section and one of the most active members of the section, who passed away in 2003; Civility Awards to recognize an attorney and judge for outstanding civility and professionalism in their dealings with fellow judges, attorneys, parties, witnesses, and the public; Rabb Emison Awards, which recognize an individual and an organization that have demonstrated a commitment to promote diversity and equality in the legal profession; and the Hon. Viola Taliaferro Award, which recognizes an individual who best exemplifies Judge Taliaferro’s courageous leadership in addressing the unmet legal needs of children and in raising the public’s awareness of these needs.

There are other awards as well. For more information and nomination forms, contact the ISBA at (317) 639-5465 or (800) 266-2581, or visit the bar’s website.

The Allen County Bar Association is accepting nominations for the Niemann Citation, which honors the memory of Scott T. Niemann and recognizes ACBA members who, like Scott, exemplify professionalism and excellence in the practice of law, as reflected in distinguished legal work, professionalism, public service, and leadership. Nominations are due Aug. 2; the form can be found here.

The Indianapolis Bar Association is accepting nominations until July 31 for the Antoinette Dakin Leach Award, which recognizes the accomplishments of female attorneys in central Indiana. It also is seeking nominations for: the IBA Professionalism Award that recognizes an attorney, and the IBA Silver Gavel Award that honors a judge. The nominations for these are due Aug. 5. Nominations may be submitted to the IBA, 135 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 1500, Indianapolis, IN 46204. For more information, call (317) 269-2000.

In addition, the Indiana Judges Association seeks to recognize those members of the judiciary who have made special contributions to the judicial profession by their efforts in community relations. Nominees should have in the past year conducted programs, projects or sustained efforts that inform and educate the public or otherwise enhance the image of the judiciary. The nomination form for the 2010 Commendation for Excellence In Public Information and Education is here.  

The association also will recognize individual reporters or newspapers, radio or television firms that sustained efforts that inform and educate the public about the judiciary. The nomination form for this award is here.


Nominations for both IJA awards are due Aug. 17 to the Indiana Judicial Center, 30 S. Meridian St., Suite 900, Indianapolis, IN 46204.

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  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

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