ILNews

On the Move - 1/30/13

IL Staff
January 31, 2013
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On The Move highlights employment news, awards and honors attorneys receive, and board appointments or elected positions. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpg. Color images are preferred. Information must be submitted at least 10 days before the Wednesday issue in which it is to appear. Submit your announcement at http://www.theindianalawyer.com/submit-on-the-move or email to managing editor Jennifer Nelson at jnelson@ibj.com.

New Associations
Dimitrios Lalos and Aliza Malouf have joined Ice Miller LLP in Indianapolis. Lalos belongs to the firm’s tax group; Malouf belongs to the f irm’s litigation and intellectual property services group.

*Erik C. Johnson has joined Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP’s Indianapolis office as an associate in the firm’s business & finance practice group.

Michelle R. Maslowski has joined Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart P.C. as an associate in the Indianapolis office. Her practice focuses on employment law, litigation and traditional labor relations.

*Tenley Drescher-Rhoades has rejoined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP at its 96th Street office in Indianapolis as counsel in the corporate practice.

*Norman G. Tabler Jr. has rejoined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP as counsel in the firm’s health care group.

*Christine Graffis Long has rejoined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP as counsel in the firm’s corporate practice.

*Mary Beth Claus is the new general counsel for Indiana University Health. She replaces Norman G. Tabler, who retired in December.
 

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*Jamie R. Kauther and Shelbie J. Byers have joined Hoeppner Wagner & Evans LLP in Merrillville as associates. Kauther and Byers both focus their practices in labor & employment law and litigation.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Judith Klaswick Fitzgerald, who serves in Pittsburgh, Pa., will join Indiana Tech Law School faculty full time after she retires from the bench this summer.

Kassandra Green has joined Hocker & Associates LLC as an associate.

*Samantha E. DeWester has been named city prosecutor for the city of Indianapolis.

Promotions
*Kimera J. Hall, *Brian M. Falcon and *Darren A. Craig have been promoted to members in Frost Brown Todd LLC’s Indianapolis office.

Greg Bokota, managing partner of Garan Lucow Miller P.C.’s Indiana office, has been elected as a shareholder.

*Amy L. VonDielingen has been elected partner at Wooden & McLaughlin LLP.

Kimberly W. Blanchet, *J. Curtis Greene, *Kara Kapke, Glen M. Kellett and *Jeanine Kerridge have been named partners at Barnes & Thornburg LLP’s Indianapolis office. *Joel D. Duthie has been named partner at the firm’s Elkhart office.

*Michael A. Setlak is now a partner at Shilts Law Office in Fort Wayne.

*Keith Wolak has been voted to equity partnership at Hoeppner Wagner & Evans LLP in Valparaiso.

Terrence L. Brookie has been appointed practice group leader for Frost Brown Todd LLC’s construction law group. He will oversee 15 attorneys throughout Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.

*Steve E. Runyan and *Harley K. Means have become partners at Kroger Gardis & Regas LLP.

Appointments & Elections
*Ronan Johnson, of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, has been elected vice chair of the executive committee of the Indianapolis Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division.

*Anne M. Hamilton, of Kroger Gardis & Regas LLP, is a new member of the Professional Advisor Leadership Council of Central Indiana Community Foundation.

*Jeff Papa has been elected president of the Zionsville Town Council.

Awards & Honors
Christine Hickey, partner at Rubin & Levin P.C., has been elected into the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation.

*Tim O’Hara, partner at Bose McKinney & Evans LLP, has been selected as a fellow of the Litigation Counsel of America.•

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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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