ILNews

On the Move - 7/6/12

IL Staff
July 4, 2012
Keywords
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
On The Move

On The Move runs in the first issue of the month. Information must be submitted two weeks prior to the issue date. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg. Color images are preferred. Submissions may be made at http://www.theindianalawyer.com submit-on-the-move or emailed to managing editor Jennifer Nelson at jnelson@ibj.com.

New Associations
Anne L. Cowgur has joined Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP’s Indianapolis office as a partner in its litigation and labor and employment practice groups.

Chris W. Cotterill has joined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP in downtown Indianapolis as a partner on the government team. Cotterill formerly served as the city of Indianapolis’ chief of staff and corporation counsel.

Samuel K. Conrad has joined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP in Fort Wayne as an associate. His practice will focus on labor and employment law.

John Hirschman has rejoined Faegre Baker Daniels LLP as counsel. He will practice on the real estate and construction team from the 96th Street office in Indianapolis.

Former Indiana Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard has joined Indiana University’s Public Policy Institute in I.U.’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs as the first executive in residence.

Awards and Honors
Retired vice president and general counsel of Indiana University Dorothy Frapwell recently received the President’s Medal for Excellence, the highest honor an I.U. president can bestow.

Kevin Thompson, of Plews Shadley Racher & Braun LLP, has been certified as an ARIAS-US arbitrator. The AIDA Reinsurance and Insurance Arbitration Society, ARIAS-US is a nonprofit corporation that promotes improvements of the insurance and reinsurance arbitration process for international and domestic markets.

Marion Superior Judge David J. Dreyer has been awarded the Professional Pillar of Excellence Award by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, where he has taught for more than 20 years.

Melanie M. Dunajeski, a partner in the Merrillville office of Drewry Simmons Vornehm LLP, was named Influential Northwest Indiana Woman of the Year in Law at the annual Influential Women of Northwest Indiana Awards Banquet.

Appointments and Elections
The 2012-2013 board and officers of the Indiana Chapter of the Association of Legal Administrators are: president Christine L. Birch, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP; president-elect Susan M. Cutsinger (Riley Bennet & Egloff LLP); immediate past president Debra L. Elsbury (Threlkeld & Associates); treasurer David W. Heinekamp (Kightlinger & Gray LLP); secretary Carrie K. Houston (Ice Miller LLP); education chair Joannie Saba (Cantrell Strenski & Mehringer LLP); membership chair Robin R. Burton (Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman P.C.); and special projects Janet C. Valasek (Barnes & Thornburg LLP).

Bose McKinney & Evans LLP partner Chad Walker has been elected to the Damien Center board of directors.

Jessica Benson Cox, a litigation associate at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP, has been appointed to the board of directors of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Indiana State Chapter. Her two-year term began July 1.

Lauren K. Robel has been appointed Indiana University executive vice president and provost, effective July 1. Robel, dean of the I.U. Maurer School of Law since 2003, served as interim provost before her appointment.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
2015 Distinguished Barrister &
Up and Coming Lawyer Reception

Tuesday, May 5, 2015 • 4:30 - 7:00 pm
Learn More


ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  2. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  3. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  4. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  5. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

ADVERTISEMENT