ILNews

On the Move - 10/12/11

IL Staff
October 12, 2011
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On The Move

On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days prior to the Wednesday issue in which the announcement will appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg. Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact editor Kelly Lucas at klucas@ibj.com

New Associations
Amy Huffman Oliver has joined Stafford Law Offices in Bloomington. Her practice focuses on family law and domestic violence issues.

Douglas S. Byrum has joined Lewis & Kappes in the firm’s Zionsville office as of counsel. Byrum focuses in the areas of business, real estate, employment and contract law.

Benjamin A. Blair has been promoted to associate at Baker & Daniels. He will practice in the firm’s downtown Indianapolis office in the area of state and local tax law. Blair served as a law clerk with the firm prior to the promotion.

Laura Yockey has rejoined Baker & Daniels as an associate in the firm’s business and corporate finance group. She will practice in the firm’s north side Indianapolis office.

Sarah Rees Hamilton has joined Taft Stettinius & Hollister as an associate in the firm’s Indianapolis office. She will practice in the firm’s business and finance practice group.

Daniel J. Greenhalgh has joined Maginot Moore & Beck as an associate in the firm’s Indianapolis office.

New Firms
The law firm of Dilley & Oakley has opened at 933 Keystone Way in Carmel. Name partners are Daniel K. Dilley and Robert M. Oakley.

The law firm of Wanzer Edwards has opened in Indianapolis. Name partners are Holly J. Wanzer and Elisabeth M. Edwards. The firm is temporarily located at 101 W. Ohio St., Suite 200.

Zionsville law firm Burrus & Burrus has changed its name to Burrus & Sease. Name partners are Roger L. Burrus and Beth A. Sease. The firm is located at 410 W. Oak St.

Awards & Honors
Baker & Daniels attorney Charles Schalliol is being awarded the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship Award for 2011 from Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management. The award, which recognizes achievement and creativity in entrepreneurship, will be presented Oct. 20.

Cohen Garelick & Glazier attorney MaryEllen Kiley Bishop will receive a 2011 Indiana Woman of Achievement Award from Ball State University’s College of Sciences and Humanities. The recognition, given to Bishop for distinction in the legal profession, will be presented Oct. 19.

Elections & Appointments
Wagner Reese & Crossen attorney Jason R. Reese has been elected president to the board of directors of CenterPoint Counseling, a nonprofit organization affiliated with Second Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis.

The Indiana Creditors Bar Association has elected the following attorneys as its officers for 2011-2012: Julia Andrews, Bleecker Brodey & Andrews, president; Daniel Sandlin, Suess & Sandlin, vice president; Joe Guy, Guy Law Offices, treasurer; Valerie Matheis, Bowman Heintz Boscia & Vician, secretary.

Taft Stettinius & Hollister attorney John D. Papageorge has been appointed to the Zoobilation Committee for the Indianapolis Zoo.

Certifications
Cohen Garelick & Glazier attorney Steven M. Crell has added the designation Registered Civil Mediator to his scope of practice.

Baden Gage & Schroeder senior manager Mike Smith received the Accredited Senior Appraiser designation from the American Society of Appraisers.•

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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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