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On The Move - 10/27/10

October 27, 2010
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On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days before the Wednesday issue in which it is to appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg; Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact  editor Rebecca Collier at rcollier@ibj.com

New Associations
Scott J. Preston has joined Labor and Employment law firm Littler Mendelson as a shareholder.

Robert B. Hebert was named vice president and general counsel of The College Network.

The Tabor Law Firm recently added attorney Robert W. Johnson. He has represented persons injured or killed due to another’s negligence. He has personally represented over 650 clients in various personal injury and wrongful death cases including automobile collisions, trucking collisions, and motorcycle accidents.

Laurie Goetz Kemp has recently joined Kightlinger & Gray as a partner. Kemp has experience in the areas of employment law and workers compensation matters. She has been practicing law in the Southern Indiana/Louisville metropolitan region for more than 14 years providing legal services and employment advice to local and regional companies.

Effective Jan. 1, 2011, Bingham McHale will have four new partners: David Adams, Christi Anderson, Melissa Ford and Shannon Landreth. Anderson concentrates her practice on estate and gift planning, estate administration, probate litigation and representation in adoption and guardianship proceedings. Adams currently focuses on corporate and general business transactions and real estate development, including sales, acquisitions and leasing. Ford regularly advises clients regarding business entity structuring, partnership taxation, real estate and business sales and acquisitions. Landreth concentrates her practice in the area of business litigation in federal and state trial and appellate courts.

New Firms/Locations
Attorneys Carol Applegate and Anita A. Harden have formed a new firm. The Applegate and Harden Law Firm is a full-service elder law practice specializing in healthcare, public benefits including Medicaid, Veteran’s benefits application and approval, Social Security and SSI, housing, advance directives such as healthcare and financial powers of attorney and cremation authorizations, neglect and exploitation, guardianship petitions, grandparent adoptions, and probate issues

The Indianapolis law firm of Schuckit & Associates has purchased a 10,000 square foot building in the Zionsville/Carmel area behind Starbucks, near 106th Street and Michigan Road, and has moved its headquarters from the top floor of Market Tower. The firm moved 9 attorneys and 8 staff members.

Elections and Appointments
Barnes & Thornburg announced that one of its partners, Peter Morse, has been re-elected to the board of directors of TerraLex, a global legal network of law firms which Barnes & Thornburg helped found two decades ago in order to assist its clients with legal needs around the globe. TerraLex has 160 member law firms in 100 countries and 41 U.S. states, and is one of the largest international legal networks.

The Indiana Supreme Court announced the Board of Law Examiners (BLE) secretary, María Pabón López, has been appointed to the Editorial Advisory Committee of the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The Editorial Advisory Committee reviews and comments on articles for publication in “The Bar Examiner,” which is published quarterly, and is the only national publication related to bar admissions.

American Health Lawyers Association selected 15 members to serve on its recently established Young Professionals Council, including Hall Render’s Andrea L. Impicciche. Impicciche focuses on corporate transactional law, including hospital acquisitions, physician practice acquisitions and physician/hospital joint ventures.

LewisWagner announced that John C. Trimble has been appointed chair of the Public Policy Committee of DRI, The Voice of the Defense Bar. He focuses much of his time on insurance coverage disputes, bad faith defense, lawyer and insurance agent malpractice, business litigation, and catastrophic damages caused by all types of casualty risks, including transportation, construction, product liability, fires, and governmental liability, to name a few.

Amie Peele Carter of Baker & Daniels in Indianapolis has been appointed chair of the American Intellectual Property Law Association’s trademark committee. As chair, Carter will lead the AIPLA committee responsible for monitoring the laws and treaties of the United States concerning trademarks, trade names and unfair competition.

Gov. Mitch Daniels announced the appointment of Stephen Robertson as commissioner of the Department of Insurance (DOI). Robertson, who has served as DOI’s executive director since June, replaces Carol Cutter who passed away. Robertson joined DOI in 2008, first as director of the Title Insurance Division and then as deputy commissioner of the Title and Bail Bond Division.

Awards and Honors
LewisWagner has been selected to receive DRI’s Law Firm Diversity Award for 2010. The award honors a law firm that demonstrates a significant commitment to diversity not only through policies and practices, but also by civic contributions. LewisWagner is the first law firm in Indiana to receive this recognition.

Judge Gregory J. Donat of the Tippecanoe Superior Court in Lafayette has been named the 2010 recipient of the American Judicature Society’s Kathleen M. Sampson Access to Justice Award. The award recognizes Judge Donat’s leadership of efforts to improve access to justice for all people. In addition to his work in Indiana, Donat has led and contributed to national projects to enhance access to justice through specialized courts.

Julia Blackwell Gelinas, appellate practice group leader and partner at Frost Brown Todd, will be receiving the Antoinette Dakin Leach Award from the Women and the Law Division of the Indianapolis Bar Association. The award is only presented when the Division feels an appropriate candidate is worthy of the award for her professional and personal accomplishments. Gelinas practices in the area of appellate, construction, fidelity and surety and other commercial matters.

Ralph Adams, the former executive director and staff attorney of Legal Services of Maumee Valley in Fort Wayne, received the Indiana Pro Bono Commission’s Randall T. Shepard Award for excellence in pro bono. Adams is active with the Volunteer Lawyer Program of Northeast Indiana.•

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  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

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