ILNews

On The Move - 2/2/11

IL Staff
February 2, 2011
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On The Move

On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days before the Wednesday issue in which it is to appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg; Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact managing editor Kelly Lucas at klucas@ibj.com

Elections And Appointments

Charles A. Cohen, a partner at Cohen Garelick & Glazier, has been appointed as chair for the Jewish Federations of North America’s Planned Giving and Endowment Committee. Cohen has also returned to the Jewish Federation of North America board of trustees.

The Marion Superior Court elected a new executive committee. Judge John Hanley will serve as presiding judge in 2011. Judges Becky Pierson-Treacy, David Certo, and Marc Rothenberg will serve as associate presiding judges.

Jason R. Reese, a partner at Wagner Reese & Crossen, has been elected to the board of directors of CenterPoint Counseling and will serve as its vice president.

Promotions
Wooden & McLaughlin has named four lawyers partners in the firm. Matt Adolay focuses his practice on landlord/tenant, product liability, premises liability, and creditors’ rights issues. Tim Hightower focuses his practice on sophisticated commercial transactions with an emphasis on multi-family and commercial real estate finance and development. Mark L. Boos and Samuel J. Arena recently joined the firm as partners and concentrate their practices in real estate, finance, leasing, and business.

D. Andrew Nestrick has been named a partner with Bamberger Foreman Oswald & Hahn. Nestrick concentrates his practice on estate planning, business law, elder law, and real estate law.

Two Baker & Daniels lawyers have been named counsel in the firm. Shawna Meyer Eikenberry practices with the construction and real property litigation team in the firm’s downtown Indianapolis office. Scott C. Burns focuses his practice in business planning and real estate law in the firm’s Fort Wayne office.

Four Kightlinger & Gray lawyers have been named partners in the firm. Sacha L. Armstrong concentrates her practice on general insurance defense litigation, product liability, worker’s compensation, and liquor liability. Aubrey G. Kuchar focuses her practice on employment and worker’s compensation. Nicholas W. Levi focuses his practice on general insurance defense litigation, product liability, and transportation. Michael Wroblewski concentrates his practice on civil rights, construction, governmental liability, general insurance defense litigation, product liability, and transportation.

Two Frost Brown Todd lawyers have been named partners in the firm. James A. Butz focuses his practice in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, general business matters, private equity transaction, and corporate governance. Lucy R. Dollens concentrates her practice in appellate and business litigation.

New Firms/Locations
Judy M. Tyrrell has formed a new matrimonial and family law firm. The law office of Judy M. Tyrrell is located at Keystone Crossing in Indianapolis.

Eric C. Lewis has established the law firm Lewis Legal Services in Indianapolis. Lewis concentrates his practice on consumer bankruptcy and estate planning.•

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  1. Future generations will be amazed that we prosecuted people for possessing a harmless plant. The New York Times came out in favor of legalization in Saturday's edition of the newspaper.

  2. Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

  3. I pd for a bankruptcy years ago with Mr Stiles and just this week received a garnishment from my pay! He never filed it even though he told me he would! Don't let this guy practice law ever again!!!

  4. Excellent initiative on the part of the AG. Thankfully someone takes action against predators taking advantage of people who have already been through the wringer. Well done!

  5. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

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