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On The Move - 4/13/11

April 13, 2011
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On The Move

On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days prior to the Wednesday issue in which the announcement will appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg. Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact managing editor Kelly Lucas at klucas@ibj.com

Editor’s note: The Indiana Lawyer is now accepting new associate announcements for the On the Move section.

New Associations
Thomas D. Perkins has joined Frost Brown Todd’s Indianapolis office as counsel in the firm’s government services practice group. Sarah S. Riordan has joined the firm as a member of the government services practice group.

Robert A. Wade has joined Krieg DeVault’s South Bend office as a partner. Wade’s practice is concentrated in the representation of health systems, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, physician groups, physicians, and other medical providers.

Jaimie L. Zibrowski has joined Ruppert & Schaefer in Indianapolis as an associate in the firm’s divorce and family law practice.

Paul E. Singleton has joined Baker & Daniels’ South Bend office as an associate in the firm’s labor and employment law practice.

M. Alex Beatty and Henry Mestetsky have joined Katz & Korin in Indianapolis as associates.

ELECTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS

MaryEllen Kiley Bishop, a partner with Cohen Garelick & Glazier in Indianapolis, has been appointed secretary of the Trust and Estate Specialty Board of Indiana. Bishop has also been selected to Martindale-Hubbell’s inaugural Bar Register of Preeminent Women Lawyers.

Bill Winingham, a partner with Wilson Kehoe Winingham in Indianapolis, has been elected by attorneys in the Indiana Court of Appeals 2nd District to serve on the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission and the Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications.

Indiana Court of Appeals Chief Judge Margret G. Robb has been elected to the American Law Institute. The ALI produces scholarly work to clarify, modernize, and otherwise improve the law.

Drewry Simmons Vornehm partner William E. Kelley Jr. has been named to the Associated Builders & Contractors National Green Building Committee. He practices in the firm’s Carmel office, and will represent chapters located in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and Michigan.

AWARDS AND HONORS

Barnes & Thornburg partner Jimmie McMillian has been selected for the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity’s newly launched nationwide Legal Diversity Fellows Program. He practices in the firm’s Indianapolis office.

Promotions
Michael L. Schultz and Jeremy L. Fetty have been named partners with Parr Richey Obremskey Frandsen & Patterson. Schultz practices in the firm’s Indianapolis office and is a civil litigator in areas including employment, commercial and residential property damage, insurance, civil rights, personal injury, toxic torts, unincorporated associations, contracts, worker’s compensation and wrongful death. Fetty practices in the firm’s Lebanon office and focuses his practice on corporate, cooperative, labor and employment, and utility law.

Brita A. Horvath has been promoted to manager of diversity and pro bono at Baker & Daniels in Indianapolis.

New Firms/Locations
Barnes & Thornburg has expanded its legal practice into the Los Angeles market with the addition of five new partners in that location. Former Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld attorneys Stephen Mick, Kevin Rising, Jason Karlov, Kyle Kirwan, and Scott Witlin have joined Barnes & Thornburg. David Allen, former managing partner of Akin Gump’s Los Angeles office, plans to join Barnes & Thornburg in the second quarter of 2011.

Attorney Steven K. Dick has formed SK Dick & Associates, located in downtown Indianapolis. Dick concentrates his practice on tax appeals and collection representation along with individual and small business Chapter 7, 11, and 13 bankruptcy.•

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  1. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  2. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  3. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

  4. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  5. This article proved very enlightening. Right ahead of sitting the LSAT for the first time, I felt a sense of relief that a score of 141 was admitted to an Indiana Law School and did well under unique circumstances. While my GPA is currently 3.91 I fear standardized testing and hope that I too will get a good enough grade for acceptance here at home. Thanks so much for this informative post.

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