On The Move - 5/26/10

May 26, 2010
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On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days before the Wednesday issue in which it is to appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg; Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact managing editor Elizabeth Brockett at


Frost Brown Todd member Terrence L. Brookie, Indianapolis, has been elected to the American College of Construction Lawyers Board of Governors. Brookie also serves as co-chair of the ACCL’s Insurance Committee and concentrates his practice in the area of construction and surety law.

Gov. Mitch Daniels has reappointed John H. Brooke, partner at Brooke Mawhorr in Muncie, and Sharon L. Groeger, legal counsel for Indiana University, Bloomington, to the Indiana Political Subdivision Risk Management Commission. Daniels also appointed Suzanne M. O’Malley, assistant director of the Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council, Fishers, and Sonya Scott-Dix, attorney at Dix Law, Merrillville, to the Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Council.

New Associations
Melinda (“Mindy”) R. Shapiro has joined Krieg DeVault’s Indianapolis office as a partner. Her practice includes medical and professional malpractice defense of nursing homes and other health-care providers as well as representation of health-care providers in litigation and enforcement proceedings. 

James A. Coles, Ryan O. White and Anthony P. Filomena II have joined Taft Stettinius & Hollister in Indianapolis as partners, expanding the firm’s intellectual property practice. Taft now will extend its services into Raleigh, N.C., where the new attorneys have an established client base.

Jan Michelsen, a shareholder at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart in Indianapolis, has been inducted as a Litigation Counsel of America Fellow. Fellows are selected and invited after being evaluated on effectiveness and accomplishment in litigation and trial work, along with ethical reputation. She counsels and defends management in all areas of labor and employment law.

The Fort Wayne-Allen County Economic Development Alliance presented its Community Spirit Award to retired Baker & Daniels lawyer Mac Parker. The award was then renamed the “Maclyn Parker Swagger Award for Community Spirit” for its initial recipient. Parker had practiced law at Baker & Daniels for more than 50 years.

Kim Ferraro, founder and executive director of the Legal Environmental Aid Foundation of Indiana, received this year’s Cloverdale College Community Service Award. The award was given in recognition of her tireless efforts to empower Indiana residents and conservation organizations to fight pollution in their communities. Ferraro heads the only nonprofit environmental law center in Indiana. 

James M. Barkley, general counsel and secretary of Simon Property Group Inc. in Indianapolis, was honored at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Spirit of Philanthropy Luncheon and Awards ceremony. The award is given to those who contributed to excellence in a school or program at IUPUI.•


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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.