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On The Move - 8/18/10

August 18, 2010
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On The Move

On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days before the Wednesday issue in which it is to appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg; Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact managing editor Elizabeth Brockett at ejbrockett@ibj.com

Promotions
Walter Sandoval of Schererville has become a partner of Hilbrich Cunningham Schwerd Dobosz & Vinovich. The law firm has offices in Highland and Portage. Sandoval is licensed to practice law in Indiana and Illinois. He focuses on personal injury, medical malpractice, and wrongful-death cases.

Elliott I. Pinkie has been appointed partner at Hoover Hull in Indianapolis. Pinkie practices in the areas of medical malpractice and nursing home defense, medical licensing and credentialing, premises and products liability, and general civil litigation.

Honors/Awards
The Indiana Paralegal Association presented the following awards to paralegals around Indiana: Leadership Award – Courtney Mills, Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman; Outstanding Board Member of the Year – Debra Davis, Bingham McHale; Outstanding New Member – Heather Schuyler, Kroger Gardis & Regas; and Outstanding Paralegal of the Year – Lauren Jones, Jones Wallace.

New fellows of the Indiana Bar Foundation were inducted recently at the Fellows annual dinner and meeting in French Lick.

The New Patron Fellows for 2010 are Richard Komyatte, Richard Komyatte & Associates, Highland; Robert C. Beasley, Paws Inc., Albany; Darnail Lyles, Darnail Lyles Counselor at Law, Gary; Marianne Mitten Owen, Stuart & Branigin, Lafayette; Jerome Withered, Withered Burns & Persin, Lafayette; and Richard J. Thrapp and Michael A. Wukmer, Ice Miller, Indianapolis.

The New Master Fellows are George N. Bewley Jr., Bewley & Koday, Fort Wayne; Mark A. Warsco, Rothberg Logan & Warsco,  Fort Wayne; Eric M. Cavanaugh, Duke Energy Indiana, Plainfield;  Charles R. Dunlap, Indiana Bar Foundation, Indianapolis; John David Hoover, Hoover Hull, Indianapolis; John V. Moriarty, Woodard Emhardt Moriarty McNett & Henry, Indianapolis; Daniel W. Bradford, The Law Office of Daniel W. Bradford, Indianapolis; and Robert T. Grand and Kenneth H. Inskeep, Barnes & Thornburg, Indianapolis.

The New Fellows are Ronald W. Buchmeier, Hopper Blackwell, Indianapolis; David J. Carr and Philip C. Genetos, Ice Miller, Indianapolis; John A. Cremer and Suzanne Katt, Cremer & Cremer, Indianapolis; J. Murray Clark, Baker & Daniels, Indianapolis; Edward A Sullivan III, Baker & Daniels, South Bend; Michael R. Conner and Donald R. Lundberg, Barnes & Thornburg, Indianapolis; Michael V. Knight, Damon R. Leichty, and David Pruitt, Barnes & Thornburg, South Bend; David J. Theising, Harrison & Moberly, Indianapolis; Alice McKenzie Morical, Hoover Hull, Indianapolis; Claire E. Lewis, The Law Office of Claire E. Lewis, Indianapolis; Lante K. Earnest and Robert G. Weddle, Tabbert Hahn Earnest & Weddle, Indianapolis; John F. Culp, Kenneth J. Allen & Associates, Noblesville; Amy G. Higdon, Kenneth J. Allen & Associates, Carmel; Bryan L. Bradley, Kenneth J. Allen & Associates, Valparaiso; Edward J. Hussey, Liberty Homes, Valparaiso; Barry Rooth, Theodoros & Rooth, Merrillville; Hon. Dena Martin, Green Superior Court, Bloomfield; Mark Foster, Foster & O’Daniel, Evansville; Michael Charles Keating, Keating & LaPlante, Evansville; Dirck H. Stahl, Ziemer Stayman Weitzel & Shoulders, Evansville; and Russell T. Woodson, Evansville.

Elections/Appointments
James Dimos, an Indianapolis member of Frost Brown Todd, became a member of the American Bar Association Board of Governors. He focuses his practice on business litigation.

The Indiana Paralegal Association recently installed its 2010-11 officers and directors: Pamela Retherford, president; Diana Miller, vice president; Brenda Johnson, secretary; Kathy Thurston, treasurer; Debbie Davis, education director; Lauren Jones, ethics director; Jillian Szalankiewcz, fundraiser director; Angela White, job bank director; Kari Berger, marketing/public relations director; Julie Johnson, membership director; Teri Ulm, monthly meetings director; Tammy Froelich, newsletter editor director; Edna Wallace, National Federation of Paralegal Associations primary director; Emily Miller, parliamentarian director; and Monica Dabio, technology director.•
 

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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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