ILNews

On The Move -3/2/12

IL Staff
February 29, 2012
Keywords
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
On The Move

On The Move: Information must be submitted at least 11 days prior to the Wednesday issue in which the announcement will appear. Digital images should be 200 dpi and saved as eps, tiff or jpeg. Color images are preferred. For more information or to submit an announcement, contact managing editor Jennifer Nelson at jnelson@ibj.com

New Associations
Sarah Moshe has joined Lewis & Kappes as of counsel. Moshe practices immigration law. Dallin Lykins has joined Lewis & Kappes as an associate. Lykins focuses his practice in immigration law.

Marian Drenth has joined O’Neill McFadden & Willett in Dyer as a partner.

Jonathan Boguth has joined the Indianapolis office of Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman as an associate. He practices in the firm’s health information technology section.

Tara K.H. Rabiola has joined Ruppert & Schaefer. Her practice will focus on dissolution of marriage and other family law matters.

Justin Leverton has joined the Indianapolis-based Kroger Gardis & Regas as an associate. He will represent clients in complex business transactions and litigation.

Josh Martin has joined Lewis and Wilkins as an associate. His primary practice areas are business law, estate planning and civil litigation.

Thomas P. Stafford and John M. Bradshaw have joined Krieg DeVault. Stafford, an associate, joined the firm’s employee benefits and executive compensation, and ESOP practices. Bradshaw, of counsel, will practice as a patent and trademark attorney.

Ayoade Adewopo has joined Coleman Stevenson & Montel as senior counsel.

Hannah J. Barnard has joined Bryce Downey & Lenkov in Merrillville. Barnard focuses her practice on workers’ compensation defense and litigation.

Elliott I. Pinkie, Dean C. Snyder, Justin C. Wiler, and Mary Katherine MacGill have joined Schultz & Pogue. Pinkie joined as a partner; Snyder, Wiler and MacGill have joined as associates.

Meghan McNab has joined Krieg DeVault’s health care practice.

Promotions
Angela Adams has been promoted to director in the immigration group at Lewis & Kappes. Sara Blevins has been promoted to director in the firm’s litigation group.

Justin T. Nestor has been promoted to partner at Bryce Downey & Lenkov in Merrillville. He focuses his practice on workers’ compensation defense.

Thomas B. Bays is now a partner at Norris Choplin Schroeder.

Rich Blaiklock has been elected as the first deputy managing partner of Lewis Wagner.

Michael O’Brien has been promoted to vice president of Bose Public Affairs Group.

Séamus Boyce and Alexander Pinegar have been named partners at Church Church Hittle & Antrim. Boyce primarily represents clients in matters involving schools and educational entities; Pinegar focuses on school law, and commercial and personal injury litigation.

Carl Hayes has been elected partner at Bingham Greenebaum Doll.

Charles S. Smith and Kori L. McOmber have been named partners at Schultz & Pogue.

Tina Nommay has been appointed to oversee operation of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Fort Wayne branch. Nommay, an assistant U.S. attorney, has been with the office since 1989.

Krieg DeVault partner Jeffrey C. McDermott has been named chair of the firm’s litigation practice.

Appointments and Elections
Krieg DeVault partner Thomas J. Costakis has been elected to serve on the firm’s executive committee.

Indiana Justice Steven David has been elected president of the board of the Community Foundation of Boone County.

Kim Ferraro has been appointed water and agricultural policy director at the Hoosier Environmental Council.

Steven P. Meyer of Lafayette firm Ball Eggleston has been elected president of the Lafayette City Council. He was also recently named as the firm’s managing partner.

Lewis and Wilkins associate Andrew Wells has been elected Beech Grove City Court judge.

Bose McKinney & Evans partner Gregory Hahn has been elected treasurer of the Central Indiana Community Foundation and the Indianapolis Foundation board of trustees. Hahn has also been elected chairman of the Athenaeum Foundation board of trustees for 2012.

Bose McKinney & Evans partner David Duncan was selected as first vice president of the Indianapolis Bar Foundation’s board of directors.

Bose McKinney & Evans partner Trent Hahn has been selected as a member of the Starfish Initiative board of directors.

Wilson Kehoe & Winingham attorney Kelly M. Scanlan has been installed as Indianapolis Bar Foundation president.

Marion County Clerk Beth White has been elected chairperson of the Marion County Information Technology Board.

Kim Ebert has been re-elected as managing shareholder of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart.

Awards and Honors
Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman president and managing partner John P. Ryan has been named to Indianapolis Business Journal’s “40 under 40” list. The IBJ is a sister publication of Indiana Lawyer.

New Firms/Locations
R. Timothy Fletcher, Wendy A. Fletcher and Stephen J. Sullivan have opened Fletcher & Fletcher in Valparaiso. The firm will focus on estate planning, corporate law and mediation services.

Keith A. Kinney has opened Kinney Law Firm in Indianapolis. Kinney will practice in the areas of litigation and mediation.

The Law Offices of Ryan Scott Wright has opened locations in Avon and Greenwood.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  2. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  3. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

  4. I am one of Steele's victims and was taken for $6,000. I want my money back due to him doing nothing for me. I filed for divorce after a 16 year marriage and lost everything. My kids, my home, cars, money, pension. Every attorney I have talked to is not willing to help me. What can I do? I was told i can file a civil suit but you have to have all of Steelers info that I don't have. Of someone can please help me or tell me what info I need would be great.

  5. It would appear that news breaking on Drudge from the Hoosier state (link below) ties back to this Hoosier story from the beginning of the recent police disrespect period .... MCBA president Cassandra Bentley McNair issued the statement on behalf of the association Dec. 1. The association said it was “saddened and disappointed” by the decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for shooting Michael Brown. “The MCBA does not believe this was a just outcome to this process, and is disheartened that the system we as lawyers are intended to uphold failed the African-American community in such a way,” the association stated. “This situation is not just about the death of Michael Brown, but the thousands of other African-Americans who are disproportionately targeted and killed by police officers.” http://www.thestarpress.com/story/news/local/2016/07/18/hate-cops-sign-prompts-controversy/87242664/

ADVERTISEMENT