Opinions April 30, 2012

April 30, 2012
Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

7th Circuit Court of Appeals posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Supreme Court and Indiana Tax Court posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

D.A. v. State of Indiana
Juvenile. Affirms juvenile court’s decision to order inpatient treatment for D.A. who entered into a plea agreement admitting to Class B misdemeanor battery if committed by an adult and “conditionally” agreed to admit to Class C felony child molesting, if committed by an adult. D.A.’s placement is consistent with the goals for his rehabilitation. The appellate judges do not have jurisdiction to resolve the issue of whether the trial court erred in accepting his conditional plea to the child molesting charge because there was no evidence of D.A.’s intent with regard to the molesting. The conditional plea is the equivalent to a withheld judgment so there is no final judgment or appealable final order from which to appeal.

Daniel P. Millikan v. Lori A. Eifrid
Civil plenary. Affirms trial court properly determined that Eifrid was the bona fide and innocent purchaser for value of a parcel of property when applying the doctrine of equitable subrogation. The trial court erred in ordering Millikan to pay Eifrid’s attorney fees because the court didn’t determine that Millikan had committed fraud that would entitle Eifried to recover those fees. Remands with instructions to vacate the award of attorney fees.

Dontevius Hutcherson v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms convictions, including murder, attempted murder and robbery. Finds Hutcherson was afforded the opportunity to meet and question Lee face-to-face and therefore was not deprived of his right of confrontation under the state or federal constitutions. Due to the cumulative nature of evidence contained in Victor Lee’s prior statement, Hutcherson was not prejudiced when it was read aloud to the jury because Lee was illiterate.

Jason Jeffries v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms the trial court properly denied Jeffries’ motion to set aside his guilty plea. The confusion regarding application of the habitual offender count to one cause and not the other does not rise to the level of a manifest injustice. His ineffective assistance of trial counsel claim also fails.

Walter B. Duncan v. The Greater Brownsburg Chamber of Commerce, Inc.
Civil collection. Reverses denial of the chamber’s motion for summary judgment on Duncan’s breach of contract claim and remands with instructions. The most Duncan was entitled to in the event of a breach of contract by the chamber of the notice requirement was 30 days compensation, and the designated evidence does not create a genuine question regarding damages. Adopts the majority rule that “the summary discharge of an employee entitled under the employment contract to a specified period of notice ordinarily permits him to recover his compensation for the notice period only and not for the entire balance of the contract period.”

Jasper A. Wisdom v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Remands for an inquiry into Wisdom’s ability to pay the $1,600 in restitution and, if appropriate, for adjustment of the restitution amount based on that factor.

State of Indiana v. Blake Lodde (NFP)
Criminal. Reverses order granting Lodde’s motion to suppress evidence gathered during and after an investigatory stop of his vehicle. Remands with instructions.

Louis Amalfitano v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Affirms convictions, including Class B felony criminal confinement, Class C felony battery resulting in serious bodily injury, and Class D felony exploitation of an endangered adult.

Brett A. Head-Mattingly v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B felonies attempted burglary and burglary, and Class D felony theft.

Michael E. Kirk v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief.

Nancy A. Regula, as Administrator of the Estate of Daniel G. Young, Deceased v. HPG Corp., doing business as Cohen Brothers Metals Co. and Integrity Metals (NFP)
Civil tort. Affirms summary judgment in favor of HPG Corp. on a negligence claim.

J.M. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Juvenile. Affirms adjudication for what would be Class B felony child molesting if committed by an adult.

C.F. v. M.R. (NFP)
Domestic relation. Affirms order granting M.R.’s motion to modify custody.

Rodney D. Craft v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class D felonies possession of reagents and precursors with intent to manufacture a controlled substance, possession of methamphetamine, and possession of cocaine.



Sponsored by
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  2. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  3. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.

  4. rensselaer imdiana is doing same thing to children from the judge to attorney and dfs staff they need to be investigated as well

  5. Sex offenders are victims twice, once when they are molested as kids, and again when they repeat the behavior, you never see money spent on helping them do you. That's why this circle continues