Opinions Aug. 10, 2010

August 10, 2010
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals
United States of America v. Jermarcus Robinson
U.S. District Court, Northern District of Indiana, Fort Wayne Division, Judge Theresa L. Springmann.
Criminal. Affirms conviction of possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. The District Court correctly refused to suppress the cocaine police officers pulled from Robinson’s buttocks after a traffic stop. The officer wasn’t satisfied with his initial effort to pat down Robinson and was justified to return to finish the job within the bounds outlined in Terry.

Indiana Supreme Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals
Joey Wilson v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms convictions of receiving stolen auto parts as a Class C felony and driving while suspended as a Class A misdemeanor. Wilson waived for review his argument that the trial court erred in allowing the state to amend the charging information on the day before his trial was to begin. He failed to request a continuance to prepare for his defense. Wilson also failed to prove that the admission of his unredacted BMV record made it impossible for him to receive a fair trial.

Indiana Spine Group v. Pilot Travel Centers
Civil. Reverses dismissal by the Full Worker’s Compensation Board of ISG’s claim pursuant to Indiana Code Section 22-3-3-27. The two-year statute of limitations in that statue doesn’t apply. Remands for determination on the merits of ISG’s application for adjustment of claim for provider fee.

City of Indianapolis v. Cynthia Hicks on behalf of and as next friend of Jada Richards, a minor
Civil tort. Affirms nunc pro tunc order granting Hicks’ motion to correct error and reinstating her negligence suit brought against the City of Indianapolis on behalf of her minor child. The city waived any challenge based on the magistrate’s lack of authority to sign the order by not objecting until after time for ruling on the motion to correct error expired. The CCS entries provide a sufficient basis to later issue the order. The grant of the motion to correct error wasn’t an abuse of discretion because the city didn’t show noncompliance with the tort claim notice requirements of the Indiana Tort Claims Act.

Ryan Armstrong v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class C misdemeanor operating a vehicle while intoxicated, and Class A misdemeanors possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia.

Roosevelt Williams v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief.

Timothy A. Stevens v. State of Indiana (NFP)
Criminal. Affirms convictions of and sentences for Class C felonies forgery, and fraud on a financial institution, and three counts of Class D felony theft.

Thompson Thrift Construction Inc. v. Bank of Indiana, N.A. (NFP)
Civil plenary. Affirms summary judgment for Bank of Indiana in Thompson Thrift Construction’s attempt to foreclose its mechanic’s lien on a parcel of real estate on which the bank held three mortgages.

Indiana Spine Group v. Scenic Hills Care Center (NFP)
Civil. Reverses dismissal by the Worker’s Compensation Board of ISG’s application for adjustment of claim for provider fee. Remands for further proceedings.

Indiana Spine Group v. All Seasons Holdings (NFP)
Civil. Reverses dismissal by the Worker’s Compensation Board of ISG’s application for adjustment of claim for provider fee. Remands for further proceedings.

Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.


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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.