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Opinions Jan. 27, 2014

January 27, 2014
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals
The following opinion was issued after IL deadline Friday.

Annex Books Inc, et al. v. City of Indianapolis
13-1500.
Civil. Reverses District Court order upholding a city of Indianapolis ordinance limiting the hours of adult bookstores to 10 a.m. to midnight, Monday-Saturday. Remands to the District Court with instructions to enter injunction against enforcement of the closure ordinance. Finds that in light of prior Supreme Court jurisprudence, the city cannot restrict the distribution of material that might be objectionable but is not obscene. The city’s argument that the closure ordinance had reduced instances of armed robberies near the bookstore locations was “weak as a statistical matter,” the court ruled.

Indiana Court of Appeals
Frank Jacobs v. State of Indiana
49A04-1304-CR-183
Criminal. Affirmed in part, reversed in part and remanded. Orders trial court to vacate a conviction of Class C felony criminal confinement as double jeopardy to a conviction in the same case of Class B felony criminal deviate conduct.

Quanardel Wells v. State of Indiana
49A02-1306-CR-550
Criminal. Affirms conviction of two counts of Class A felony criminal deviate conduct, one count of Class A felony rape, two counts of Class B felony criminal deviate conduct, one count of Class B felony criminal confinement, one count of Class C felony criminal confinement, and one count of Class D felony strangulation. Wells’ appeal of a denial of his motion to sever the charges from different incidents was a request to reweigh a decision affirming denial the Court of Appeals made on interlocutory appeal, the court ruled. His 100-year sentence was not inappropriate based on Wells’ character and the nature of the offenses.  

Thomas D. Dillman v. State of Indiana
53A04-1306-CR-289
Criminal. Reverses denial of motion to release a cash bond and remands to the trial court for refund of a $250 cash bond. Because Dillman’s bond was posted under I.C. 35-33-8-3.2(a)(1) in 2003, the court was not authorized at that time to retain cash bonds for any purpose. A statutory change in 2006 allowed courts to retain cash bonds for purposes including paying for publicly paid costs of representation, fines, costs, fees or restitution upon conviction.

In Re The Paternity of C.J.A.: G.C. (Mother) v. T.A. (Father)
79A02-1302-JP-137
Juvenile paternity. Reverses portion of trial court’s order that automatically grants father primary custody of minor child if mother failed to move back to Indiana. Finds that order making custody modification automatic violates the state’s child custody modification statute, Indiana Code section 31-14-13-6. Judge Elaine Brown dissents, arguing because the trial court’s order was not a final judgment, the COA did not have jurisdiction over this appeal.

Ruben Rosales v. State of Indiana
48A02-1303-CR-229
Criminal. Affirms conviction for attempted murder, a Class A felony. Rules the trial court’s failure to correctly instruct the jury about accomplice liability was not a fundamental error and the evidence is more than sufficient that Rosales was the principal in an attack that led to the attempted murder charge. Judge Terry Crone dissents arguing the error is fundamental because it is not clear whether the jury convicted Rosales as the principal or as the accomplice.  

Brandon McManomy v. State of Indiana (NFP)
65A01-1302-CR-62
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class A felony attempted murder.

David D. Darr v. State of Indiana (NFP)
89A04-1307-CR-324
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class D felony dealing in a sawed-off shotgun.

Daniel Lee Pierce v. State of Indiana (NFP)
78A05-1305-CR-211
Criminal. Reverses conviction on one count of Class A felony child molesting, four counts of Class C felony child molesting, and two counts of Class D felony child molesting, and remands for a new trial. Judge John Baker dissents and would not grant a new trial.

Ventriss R. Hulitt v. State of Indiana (NFP)
45A03-1302-CR-30
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class A felony child molestation.

In Re: The Marriage of Terri L. Potter and Brent D. Potter: Terri L. Potter v. Brent D. Potter (NFP)
11A01-1304-DR-229
Domestic relation. Affirms denial of mother T.P.’s motion to correct error regarding property division and child support entered in a dissolution of marriage action.

Adam Sullender v. State of Indiana (NFP)
20A05-1308-CR-390
Criminal. Affirms denial of motion to correct erroneous sentence on a conviction of Class C felony battery resulting in serious bodily injury.

Lauren Hurse v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-1307-CR-563
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B misdemeanor disorderly conduct.

Nita Trott-Fluty v. State of Indiana (NFP)
82A05-1306-CR-290
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class D felony and Class A misdemeanor charges of resisting law enforcement and Class B misdemeanor disorderly conduct.

Larry Bobbitt v. State of Indiana (NFP)
71A03-1306-CR-221
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B felony burglary, Class D felony possession of marijuana, and the 20-year prison sentence.

Melba Deloris Polk-King v. Lawrence Delorosa King (NFP)
49A05-1305-DR-248
Domestic relation. Affirms in part, reverses in part, and remands for recalculation of child support obligations. Judge John Baker concurs in part and dissents in part and would remand to the trial court for written findings on why it deviated from the child support guidelines.

Clayton Morgan v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1306-CR-498
Criminal. Affirms revocation of probation.

Nancy Kriel v. Richard Kriel (NFP)
49A04-1304-DR-195
Domestic relation. Affirms trial court denial of Nancy Kriel’s request for an award of incapacity maintenance.

Jeffery Deaton v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A02-1306-CR-519
Criminal. Affirms conviction and 13-year sentence for Class B felony possession of methamphetamine enhanced by his status as a habitual substance offender.

Laurence F. Myers, Jr. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
45A03-1306-CR-232
Criminal. Affirms 36-month sentence for conviction of Class D felony operating a vehicle as a habitual traffic violator.

Indiana Supreme Court and Indiana Tax Court issued no opinions by IL deadline.  7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued no Indiana opinions Monday by IL deadline.
 

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  1. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  2. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  3. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  4. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  5. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

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