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Opinions Jan. 29, 2013

January 29, 2013
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Indiana Court of Appeals
John Alden v. State of Indiana
30A01-1209-CR-412
Criminal. Affirmed trial court’s denial of petition to reduce Alden’s Class D felony conviction for operating while intoxicated to a Class A misdemeanor. In a review of the state statute covering the sentencing range for Class D felonies, the COA found the statute contained the word “may” instead of “shall” which gives the courts the freedom to deny petitions.

Michael L. Curtis v. State of Indiana

49A02-1203-MI-271
Miscellaneous. Reversed and remanded with instructions the trial court’s denial of Curtis’ Indiana Trial Rule 60(B) motion for relief from judgment following the forfeiture of his truck. The COA ruled that the pirated movies Curtis was selling from his truck do not constitute stolen or converted property and therefore he is not subject to I.C. 34-24-1-1(a)(1)(B), which allows forfeiture only in cases of theft or conversion but says nothing about copyright infringement.  

Seth Anderson v. Huntington County Board of Commissioners
35A04-1207-MI-357
Miscellaneous/public records. In a case of first impression, affirmed a public access counselor ruling that a request for emails that sought those to and from four public officials over a specified time period did not meet the requirement of the Access to Public Records Act that the requests be made with “reasonable particularity.” Even though records ultimately were provided as initially requested after a suit was filed, judges held that the PAC ruling and the county’s initial denial of the records for lack of reasonable particularity were not ARPA violations.

Kelly Coots v. State of Indiana (NFP)
15A05-1203-CR-155
Criminal. Affirms sentence of a maximum of three years in prison on a conviction of Class D felony theft.

Jeffrey A. Booth v. State of Indiana (NFP)
84A01-1203-CR-118
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B felony dealing in methamphetamine and Class D felony possession of methamphetamime.

Rudy J. Smith v. State of Indiana (NFP)
53A04-1202-PC-280
Post conviction. Affirms denial of post-conviction relief.

Clarence Johnson v. Juana Johnson (NFP)
45A03-1202-DR-94
Domestic relations/dissolution. Affirms judgment of trial court in all respects.

Madelyn Smith v. State of Indiana (NFP)

49A02-1205-CR-408
Criminal. Affirms 10-year executed sentence for convictions of Class B felony neglect of a dependent, two counts of Class B felony battery, and three counts of Class D felony battery.

In Re: The Paternity of K.G.; J.G. and S.S. and A.S. (NFP)
49A05-1206-JP-307
Juvenile. Affirms trial court order awarding mother S.S. custody of daughter K.G.

Accessabilities, Inc. v. Review Board of the Indiana Dept. of Workforce Development (NFP)
93A02-1207-EX-551
Executive administration/worker’s compensation. Affirms Department of Workforce Development Review Board decision that an employee was not discharged for just cause.

Denise Polak and Dianne Rose and Dianne Rose, Lake County Trust Co., as Trustee for Trust #6041, and Jeanne Collins Living Trust, Dianne Rose, Trustee v. Tiffiny Jordan (NFP)
64A05-1205-PL-284
Civil plenary. Reverses trial court ruling joining Polak as a party to a suit filed by Jordan.

Ray Ortega v. Susko Corp., Inc., d/b/a Our Place (NFP)

45A03-1205-CT-219
Civil tort. Affirms trial court grant of judgment on the evidence in favor of Susko.

Lanard E. Foster v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A04-1207-CR-390
Criminal. Affirms concurrent three-year sentences for convictions of Class D felony domestic battery in the presence of a child under age 16 and Class D felony domestic battery with a prior domestic battery conviction.

Indiana Supreme Court and Tax Court issued no opinions by IL deadline. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued no Indiana opinions by IL deadline.
 

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  1. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  2. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  3. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  4. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

  5. Oh yes, lifetime tenure. The Founders gave that to the federal judges .... at that time no federal district courts existed .... so we are talking the Supreme Court justices only in context ....so that they could rule against traditional marriage and for the other pet projects of the sixties generation. Right. Hmmmm, but I must admit, there is something from that time frame that seems to recommend itself in this context ..... on yes, from a document the Founders penned in 1776: " He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good."

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