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Opinions July 13, 2010

July 13, 2010
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Indiana Supreme Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

Michael Akens v. State of Indiana
49A05-0912-CR-687
Criminal. Affirms sentence imposed following guilty plea to child molesting. The trial court’s statement that Akens could appeal his sentence wasn’t made until after the court had accepted the plea agreement and entered Akens’ sentence. The agreement included his express waiver of his right to appeal his sentence.

Deborah Edwards v. State of Indiana
49A02-0911-CR-1093
Criminal. Reverses conviction of Class D felony criminal recklessness. Evidence of a defendant’s absence from a crime scene is not an “alibi” defense. It is a rebuttal of the prosecution’s contention the defendant was present and thus capable of committing the crime. Remands for a new trial.

Randy Allen Long v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A02-0909-CR-903
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class D felony possession of marijuana and Class A misdemeanor possession of paraphernalia.

John C. Cole, Jr. v. Patrick V. Baker (NFP)
49A02-0910-CV-960
Civil. Reverses summary judgment for attorney Patrick Baker after he refused to return money Cole paid him as a retainer.

A.E. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A04-1001-JV-17
Juvenile. Affirms adjudication for committing what would be Class B and Class C felony child molesting if committed by an adult.

Ronald Wright v. State of Indiana (NFP)
46A03-0912-CR-594
Criminal. Affirms denial of motion to correct erroneous sentence.

Douglas K. Huffnagel v. Christopher F. Cline (NFP)
20A05-0911-CV-662
Civil. Affirms grant of Cline’s motion for a directed verdict in favor of Cline on Huffnagel’s claims for negligence and injuries following an automobile accident.

Timothy Charles Wakefield v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A04-0911-CR-647
Criminal. Remands case for a sentencing statement that clearly explains its finding of aggravating and mitigating circumstances and its reasons for imposing consecutive sentences following guilty plea to Class D felonies criminal recklessness, maintaining a common nuisance, dealing in marijuana, and possession of a controlled substance.

William D. Baxter v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-0908-PC-724
Post conviction. Reverses denial of petition for post-conviction relief.

Otis A. Tate, Jr. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
71A04-1003-CR-138
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class C felony forgery.

William Kerr v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A05-0911-CR-639
Criminal. Affirms conviction of operating a vehicle while intoxicated as a Class A misdemeanor.

D.C.B. Alleged to be C.H.I.N.S.; P.B. and Da.B. v. Marion County DCS and Child Advocates (NFP)
49A02-0912-JV-1204
Juvenile. Affirms finding D.C.B. is a child in need of services.

Term. of Parent-Child Rel. of K.I. and R.I.; K.K. and C.I. v. IDCS (NFP)
20A03-0912-JV-562
Juvenile. Affirms termination of parental rights.

Andy Zulu v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-0911-CR-1113
Criminal. Affirms convictions of and sentences for Class B felonies rape, and criminal deviate conduct.

Donald Johnston, et al. v. Carl W. Johnston, et al. (NFP)
43A03-0912-CV-568
Civil. Affirms the trial court’s judgment and order for distribution of sale proceeds.

James Gilman v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A05-0908-PC-462
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief and remands with instructions to enter an amended sentencing order.

Kenneth McClung v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-0912-CR-1275
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B felony aggravated battery.

V.B. v. Review Board of the Indiana Dept. of Workforce Development and Daimler Chrysler Co. LLC (NFP)
93A02-0911-EX-1140
Civil. Affirms dismissal of V.B.’s appeal of a determination that she was not eligible for benefits.

Lewis Vasquez v. State of Indiana (NFP)
27A02-1002-CR-135
Criminal. Reverses sentence following guilty plea to Class B felonies criminal confinement and burglary while armed with a deadly weapon. Remands for re-sentencing.

John B. Felder v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-0902-CV-156
Civil. Affirms judgment in favor of the state and Department of Correction employees in Felder’s complaint regarding events that allegedly occurred while he was at Pendleton Correctional Facility.

Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.
 

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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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