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Opinions July 16, 2010

July 16, 2010
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Tom George, et al. v. National Collegiate Athletic Association
09-3667
U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division, Judge William T. Lawrence.
Civil. Reverses dismissal of the plaintiffs’ entire second amendment complaint alleging the NCAA’s ticket-allocation process is an illegal lottery. Because plaintiffs sufficiently pleaded that the NCAA conducted a lottery, the bona-fide-business-transaction exception to the statutory definition of gambling is of no effect. The District Court erred in holding that the doctrine of in pari delicto bars plaintiffs from seeking relief from the court. Remanded for further proceedings. Judge Cudahy dissents.

Tamika Jones v. Res-Care, Inc. and Shane McFall
09-3076
U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division, Judge William T. Lawrence.
Civil. Affirms summary judgment for Res-Care and McFall in Jones’ suit alleging race discrimination, retaliation, and various state-law claims. Jones’ Title VII claims, with the exception of her retaliation claim, are barred, and affirms summary judgment with respect to the state claims of defamation and vicarious liability. She failed to establish a prima facie case under the direct method on her retaliation claim.

Indiana Supreme Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

Nathaniel L. Williams v. State of Indiana
18A02-0911-CR-1092
Criminal. Affirms convictions of two counts of Class A felony dealing in cocaine, one conviction of Class C felony possession of a controlled substance and Class D felony maintaining a common nuisance. Reverses and vacates one Class C felony conviction and remands for the trial court to correct its records to reflect the vacation of the conviction. The admission of the confidential informant’s statements did not violate Williams’ right to confront witnesses. Williams didn’t preserve for appellate review his claim that the trial court failed to properly admonish the jury.

Ruth M. Brown v. Alliance Environmental, Inc. v. R. Bruce Wallace (NFP)
49A02-0909-CV-854
Civil. Reverses part of order that awarded Brown compensatory damages resulting from Wallace’s breach of the fiduciary duty that he owed to Brown and in finding Brown held a 12 percent ownership interest in Alliance at the time of the asset sale in 2005. Remands for further proceedings. Affirms order in all other respects.

Aaron Spears v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-0912-CR-1194
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class A misdemeanor battery.

Wendy G. Thomas, as personal representative of the estate of William T. Dollard, deceased v. Carol Sparks Drake, et al. (NFP)
06A05-0907-CV-427
Civil. Grants estate’s petition for rehearing and affirms original opinion affirming summary judgment in favor of Drake.  

D.L. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-0908-JV-781
Juvenile. Affirms placement at Kokomo Academy.

Michael Shelton Scott v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1003-CR-235
Criminal. Affirms 40-year sentence for Class A felony child molesting.

Raymond Baird and George M. Cox v. State of Indiana (NFP)
31A01-0910-CR-514
Criminal. Affirms denial of Baird and Cox’s motion for review of numerous claims of error relating to the trial court’s bond schedule and conditions of bond.

Estate of Mary L. Riley and Marjorie R. Potts v. James Riley (NFP)
08A02-1001-ES-33
Estate supervised. Affirms decision in favor of James Riley’s son, trust, and grandchildren.

G.M. v. I.D.C.S. (NFP)
49A02-1001-JT-13
Juvenile. Affirms involuntary termination of parental rights.

J.M.O. v. J.C.D; J.M.O. v. D.H.M. (NFP)
07A01-0910-CV-478
Civil. Reverses denial of J.M.O.’s petitions for protective orders against her child’s father and his fiancée. Remands for further proceedings.

Aaron R. Ross v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A05-0911-CR-637
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class A felony dealing in cocaine, Class C felonies possession of cocaine and a firearm, and carrying a handgun without a license, and three counts of Class D felony possession of a controlled substance.

Joseph Matthews v. City of Indianapolis (NFP)
49A02-1002-CT-110
Civil tort. Reverses summary judgment for City of Indianapolis in Matthews’ complaint alleging the city negligently failed to place or replace a stop sign at an intersection and that proximately caused his injuries.

M.L. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-1001-JV-68
Juvenile. Affirms adjudication for committing what would be Class D felony possession of cocaine if committed by an adult.

Charles Orr v. State of Indiana (NFP)
28A01-0912-CR-603
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to burglary as a Class B felony.

K.W. v. L.C. (NFP)
14A01-0911-CV-542
Civil. Affirms denial of K.W.’s petition to terminate guardianship.

Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.
 

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  1. IF the Right to Vote is indeed a Right, then it is a RIGHT. That is the same for ALL eligible and properly registered voters. And this is, being able to cast one's vote - until the minute before the polls close in one's assigned precinct. NOT days before by absentee ballot, and NOT 9 miles from one's house (where it might be a burden to get to in time). I personally wait until the last minute to get in line. Because you never know what happens. THAT is my right, and that is Mr. Valenti's. If it is truly so horrible to let him on school grounds (exactly how many children are harmed by those required to register, on school grounds, on election day - seriously!), then move the polling place to a different location. For ALL voters in that precinct. Problem solved.

  2. "associates are becoming more mercenary. The path to partnership has become longer and more difficult so they are chasing short-term gains like high compensation." GOOD FOR THEM! HELL THERE OUGHT TO BE A UNION!

  3. Let's be honest. A glut of lawyers out there, because law schools have overproduced them. Law schools dont care, and big law loves it. So the firms can afford to underpay them. Typical capitalist situation. Wages have grown slowly for entry level lawyers the past 25 years it seems. Just like the rest of our economy. Might as well become a welder. Oh and the big money is mostly reserved for those who can log huge hours and will cut corners to get things handled. More capitalist joy. So the answer coming from the experts is to "capitalize" more competition from nonlawyers, and robots. ie "expert systems." One even hears talk of "offshoring" some legal work. thus undercutting the workers even more. And they wonder why people have been pulling for Bernie and Trump. Hello fools, it's not just the "working class" it's the overly educated suffering too.

  4. And with a whimpering hissy fit the charade came to an end ... http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2016/07/27/all-charges-dropped-against-all-remaining-officers-in-freddie-gray-case/ WHISTLEBLOWERS are needed more than ever in a time such as this ... when politics trump justice and emotions trump reason. Blue Lives Matter.

  5. "pedigree"? I never knew that in order to become a successful or, for that matter, a talented attorney, one needs to have come from good stock. What should raise eyebrows even more than the starting associates' pay at this firm (and ones like it) is the belief systems they subscribe to re who is and isn't "fit" to practice law with them. Incredible the arrogance that exists throughout the practice of law in this country, especially at firms like this one.

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