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Opinions June 17, 2010

June 17, 2010
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The following opinions were posted after IL deadline Wednesday.
Indiana Tax Court

Mirant Sugar Creek, LLC v. Indiana Dept. of State Revenue
71T10-0803-TA-18
Tax. Denies in part Mirant’s cross-motion for summary judgment on whether Mirant obtained a ruling from the Department of State Revenue providing that it wasn’t subject to the Utility Services Use Tax. The department’s denial of Mirant’s claim wasn’t precluded by Indiana Code Section 6-8.1-3-3. Affirms in part Mirant’s cross-motion for summary judgment on whether the company’s purchases of natural gas was subject to the USUT during the period at issue. Its purchases weren’t subject to the tax pursuant to I.C. sections 6-2.3-3-5 and 6-2.3-5.5-4(2). The department is ordered to refund Mirant the USUT taxes it paid for the period at issue.

Mirant Sugar Creek, LLC v. Indiana Dept. of State Revenue (NFP)

71T10-0803-TA-18
Tax. Denies the Department of State Revenue’s motion to strike in its entirety the affidavit of Mirant’s senior tax analyst and three pages of e-mails between the analyst and a tax analyst with the state department.

Today’s opinions
Indiana Supreme Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

Russel Howard v. American Family Mutual Insurance Co.
87A01-0910-CV-512
Civil. Reverses grant of American Family’s motion to substitute the underinsured driver as the sole defendant at trial in Howard’s suit following an accident. Indiana law does not allow the underinsured driver’s substitution as a nominal defendant in these circumstances.

William B. Jones v. State of Indiana
73A01-0911-CR-532
Criminal. Affirms conviction of resisting law enforcement and finding to be a habitual offender. A gaming agent of the Indiana Gaming Commission constitutes a law enforcement officer for purposes of the offense of resisting law enforcement.

Medical Realty Associates, LLC, et al. v. D.A. Dodd, Inc., et al.
45A03-0909-CV-426
Civil. Reverses order denying Medical Realty Associates and Hasse Construction Co.’s motion to compel arbitration and request to stay the mechanic’s lien foreclosure action initiated by D.A. Dodd, and declaring the arbitration unavailable for a claim brought by Korellis Roofing.  By the clear unambiguous language of the Dodd Subcontracts, Hasse is given the option to require arbitration of any or all of Dodd’s claims, including those against MRA and Pinnacle Hospital. The trial court ruled prematurely that Korellis cannot be compelled to arbitrate. Remands for further proceedings.

W.H. v. State of Indiana
49A02-0912-JV-1166
Juvenile. Affirms denial of motion to suppress evidence and adjudication for Class A misdemeanor carrying a handgun without a license. Finds that W.H.’s detention was supported by reasonable suspicion and did not offend his federal constitutional rights. Holds that the stop did not violate W.H.’s state constitutional protections, as the level of suspicion and extent of law enforcement needs outweighed the degree of intrusion.

Burl E. and Carolyn S. Grayson v. United Federal Savings & Loan Association of Crawfordsville, Ind. (NFP)
54A04-1002-MF-114
Civil. Affirms judgment for Union Federal Savings in the Graysons’ counterclaim seeking damages for Union Federal’s disposition of personal property as to which the Graysons were junior holders of a secured interest.

Patricia Garrison v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A04-0910-CR-568
Criminal. Affirms sentence imposed following revocation of probation.

Daniel Mojica, as Special Administrator of the Estate of Felix Mojica, Jr., Deceased v. Hector Rosario, et al. (NFP)
45A03-0903-CV-116
Civil. Affirms jury verdict in favor of Rosario and the City of East Chicago in Mojica’s suit following the shooting death of Mojica.

Paul Roell v. American Senior Communities, et al. (NFP)
20A03-1001-CC-7
Civil. Affirms summary judgment in favor of American Senior Communities in Roell’s suit that he was discharged in retaliation.

S.P. v. Review Board (NFP)
93A02-0912-EX-1245
Civil. Affirms S.P. is not entitled to unemployment benefits.

Byron D. Thomas v. State of Indiana (NFP)
20A03-0904-CR-182
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to dealing in cocaine, one as a Class A felony and one as a Class B felony.

Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.


 

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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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