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Opinions June 18, 2014

June 18, 2014
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Gabriel V. Mendoza v. United States of America
13-3195, 13-3196
U.S. District Court, Northern District of Indiana, South Bend Division, Judge Robert L. Miller Jr.
Civil. Affirms denial of Mendoza’s petition for relief from his drug convictions. He was not deprived due process when an interpreter relocated her position in the courtroom to translate for a witness nor was he provided ineffective assistance of counsel.

Indiana Court of Appeals
George Patrick v. Keith Butts, Superintendent, State of Indiana and Indiana Parole Board
33A04-1311-MI-577
Miscellaneous. Affirms denial of Patrick’s petition for a writ of habeas corpus. The order that Patrick participate in the Sex Offender Management and Monitoring program does not violate the ex post facto clause of the Indiana Constitution.

Michael Torres v. State of Indiana
49A02-1308-CR-727
Criminal. Affirms convictions of murder and Class A misdemeanor carrying a handgun without a license. There was no fundamental error when the chief forensic pathologist testified as an expert witness instead of the doctor who performed the autopsy, who had left the state by the time Torres’ trial began. Torres’ right to confrontation was not violated. Judge Kirsch dissents and would remand for a new trial.

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. v. Edward P. Dechert, Trustee of the Bankruptcy Estate of John E. Smith and Isley's Plumbing, Inc.
34A02-1311-PL-980
Civil plenary. Affirms denial of Wells Fargo’s motion to set aside default judgments against it in favor of Dechert, as bankruptcy trustee for John E. Smith Builders Inc. and Isley’s Plumbing Inc. Dechert’s and Isley’s second amended complaint and crossclaim did not vacate the default judgments entered in their favor against Wells Fargo. The trial court did not abuse its discretion when it denied Wells Fargo’s motion to set aside the default judgments on the basis of defective service of process. The trial court did not abuse its discretion on policy grounds when it denied the motion to set aside the default judgments.

Keith D. Bott v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1312-CR-1058
Criminal. Affirms revocation of probation.

Joshua Ketchem v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1308-PC-695
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief.

Edwin Hunt v. State of Indiana (NFP)
60A01-1309-CR-406
Criminal. Affirms 40-year sentence for Class B felony burglary and adjudication as a habitual offender.

Bruce L. Truett v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-1311-CR-926
Criminal. Affirms revocation of placement in community corrections and order Truett serve three of his six years in the Department of Correction.

Larry Page v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A05-1311-PC-556
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief.

Demitrus Grant v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-1311-CR-959
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class C felony operating a motor vehicle after license was suspended for life.

In re the Paternity of E.S.: Makayla LeGault v. Michael J. Scott (NFP)
71A05-1312-JP-606
Juvenile. Affirms modification of mother’s custody of minor child and grant of sole physical custody of child to Scott.

Christopher Baxter v. State of Indiana (NFP)
22A01-1312-CR-551
Criminal. Affirms 40-year sentence for murder.

Signature Estates of Indiana, Inc. d/b/a Gordon Marketing, Stephens-Matthews Marketing, Inc., Shields Brokerage, Inc. et al. v. Conseco Medical Insurance Company, et al. (NFP)
29A02-1310-PL-846
Civil plenary. Reverses partial summary judgment for Conseco Medical Insurance Company and other defendants in lawsuit alleging fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. Remands for further proceedings.

Omert'a LLC, Dino Zurzolo d/b/a Shangri-La East, and Wholesalers, Inc. d/b/a Shangri-La Show Club v. Phillip Gray (NFP)
93A02-1309-EX-812
Agency action. Affirms order directing payment of money to complainant Gray and other actions by the respondents.

David Gregg v. State of Indiana (NFP)
15A01-1311-CR-505
Criminal. Affirms two-year sentence imposed after Gregg admitted violating a term of his probation.

The Indiana Supreme Court and Tax Court issued no opinions prior to IL deadline. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued no Indiana decisions prior to IL deadline.
 

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  1. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  2. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  3. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  4. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  5. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

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