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Opinions June 8, 2012

June 8, 2012
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Indiana Supreme Court and Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions by IL deadline.

7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Kenneth Harper v. C.R. England, Incorporated
11-2975
U. S. District Court, Northern District of Indiana, Hammond Division, Magistrate Judge Paul R. Cherry.
Civil. Affirms District Court’s determination that Harper failed to set forth a prima facie case, under either the direct or indirect method of proof, to support his claim that C.R. England had retaliated against him for reporting what he believed to be unlawful racial discrimination. Holds that his record shows excessive absences were the cause for his termination.

Indiana Court of Appeals
Michael A. Gargano, in his official capacity as Secretary of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, et al. v. Lee Alan Bryant Health Care Facilities, Inc., et al.
49A02-1105-PL-449
Civil plenary. Reverses trial court’s determination that the Family and Social Services Administration had acted unlawfully in refusing to accept applications for Residential Care Assistance Program funds after Dec. 1, 2009, holding that the agency had acted within its power to meet budget constraints. Also reverses trial court’s finding that reimbursement rates were unlawful and remands for further proceedings.

Tricia L. Sexton v. Travis Sexton
34A02-1111-DR-1059
Domestic relation. Affirms the trial court’s order of emancipation of a daughter, holding that the daughter put herself outside the care or control of her parents and was self-supporting, and that the trial court did not err in determining that she was emancipated.

Betwel Birari v. State of Indiana
49A02-1111-CR-1009
Criminal. Affirms trial court’s conviction of attempted rape as a class B felony, finding evidence presented at trial was sufficient to support the conviction and that a prosecutor’s comments did not result in fundamental error.

Kent A. Easley v. State of Indiana, Shelby County Prosecutor's Office, R. Kent Apsley, J. Brad Landwerlen, Shelby Co. Probation Dept., Deanna Holder, Shelby Co. Superior Ct One Clerk, et al. (NFP)
49A02-1109-CT-975
Civil tort. Affirms trial court’s order dismissing Easley’s motion for default judgment.

William A. Wiley v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1111-CR-1072
Criminal. Affirms sentence for Class B felony robbery, Class A misdemeanor criminal conversion and Class A misdemeanor battery.

Michael Kucholick v. State of Indiana (NFP)
12A02-1109-CR-907
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class C felony criminal recklessness and Class B misdemeanor criminal mischief but reduces sentence to advisory standard of four years, with two years suspended to probation and two years to be executed in community corrections. Judge Edward Najam concurred in part and dissented in part.

Blake Clunie v. State of Indiana (NFP)
31A01-1109-PC-458
Post conviction. Affirms trial court’s denial of motion to correct error in Clunie’s erroneous filing of his petition for post-conviction relief, which was filed under the original cause number instead of the post-conviction cause number.
 

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  1. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  2. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  3. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  4. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  5. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

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